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What is an Anesthesiologist Assistant?

An Anesthesiologist Assistant or AA is a non-physician medical professional that practices anesthesia under the direct supervision of a specialist physician and/or anesthesiologist.  Anesthesiologist Assistants work as part of an ACT (anesthesia care team) to provide optimal care for their patient.  According to the team at the ASA, Anesthesia can generally be classified into four categories: regional, local, general, and monitored sedation.

The ACT is ultimately responsible for anesthesia consultations, personnel management, pre-anesthesia evaluations, post-anesthesia evaluations, creating an anesthetic plan, and managing a patient's anesthetic plan.  An anesthesia care team can consist of the following members depending on the organization and scope of care: physicians, anesthesiology assistants, medical assistant, anesthesiologists, anesthesiology residents, student nurse anesthetist, nurse anesthetist, anesthesiology fellows, and anesthesiologist assistant student.

Degree Median Salary vs Adjacent Degree Types

Source: BLS, US Census, and IPEDS

2021 Best Anesthesiologist Assistant Programs

Emory University provides a variety of educational opportunities for students to assist them in their growth and development. The school is located in Atlanta, Georgia and operated as a private institution. The school's United Methodist affiliation is one of its defining characteristics and plays an important role within the school's vision. Emory University has a yearly student enrollment of nearly thirteen thousand.

Students may choose from a few areas of study, including but not limited to:

  • Liberal Arts And Sciences
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Social Sciences

The admissions process will begin with the submission of an application, transcripts, records, and standardized test scores, which are then evaluated by the admissions office. Students may take either the ACT or SAT exam scores to be considered for admissions to this school. A score within the range of 1960 to 2250 on the SAT, or 30 to 33 for the ACT is usually submitted among accepted students. Admission to this school is considered highly competitive, with only 30% of students who applied being admitted each year. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is close to $45,000, but may change yearly. Students are encouraged to use the school's price of attendance calculator to better estimate their cost of attendance. The price of on-campus housing is approximately $7,700 annually. Students attending Emory University may qualify for aid which is usually scholarships, grants, and loans.

The mascot for Emory University is the "Eagles", and they participate in intercollegiate athletic programs through oversight by the NCAA. Athletic programs available:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division III)
  • Golf (NCAA Division III)

Students who wish to see more about Emory University may check out their website at http://www.emory.edu.

Acceptance Rate

15.6

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

Case Western Reserve University provides a variety of degree programs for students to guide them in their growth and development. The school is located in Cleveland, Ohio and operated as a private institution. Approximately 9,800 students are enrolled per year at Case.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs Case offers:

  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Public Administration And Social Services
  • Engineering

Students applying for admission are most often required to submit an application, school records, test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by the admissions staff. Either the ACT or SAT exam must be taken in order to be able to apply to Case Western Reserve University. Scores within the range of 28 - 32 on the ACT or 1830 - 2130 on the SAT are required to greatly increase the chance of admission. Roughly 50 percent of all applicant were admitted at this school, with 13 percent of those admitted choosing to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found here.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is approximately $43,000 per year. Tuition prices may change for a variety of reasons, and therefore students should visit the school's tuition calculator to get a better idea of their costs. The price of on-campus housing is about $7,600 per year. Financial aid may be offered to students that meet the required requirements.

The mascot for Case is the "Spartans", and they participate in intercollegiate athletic programs through the oversight and organization of the NCAA. Athletic programs available may include but not limited to:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Football (NCAA Division III)
  • Soccer (NCAA Division III)
  • Softball (NCAA Division III)

Contact information, academics information, areas of study, and more can be viewed on school's website at http://www.case.edu.

Acceptance Rate

27.36

Student to Faculty Ratio

11:1

Quinnipiac University provides a variety of program options for students to guide them in their growth and development. The school is located in Hamden, CT and operated as a private institution. Nearly eight thousand students enroll at Quinnipiac University yearly.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs Quinnipiac University offers:

  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Psychology
  • Communications And Journalism

Students applying for admission are usually asked to submit an application, transcripts, records, test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by the school. The most common test scores among students accepted to Quinnipiac University are within the range of 22 to 26 for the ACT exam, or 1500 to 1780 on the SAT exam. This school has an acceptance rate of around 63 percent of which only 13 percent decided to enroll. More information on admissions can be found at quinnipiac.edu.

Tuition is approximately $40,000 per year, though it may change based on different types of circumstances. Students should visit the school's net price calculator to determine a more personalized cost estimate. Some students at this school may be eligible for financial aid, which is typically offered as scholarships, grants, and loans.

The mascot for Quinnipiac University is the "Bobcats", and they participate in intercollegiate athletic programs through oversight by the NCAA. Sports available:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Field Hockey (NCAA Division I-AAA)

Acceptance Rate

70.12

Student to Faculty Ratio

14:1

University of Missouri - Kansas City, a public institution, offers a variety of educational opportunities, allowing students to choose which major is right for them. Located in Kansas City, MO, it offers an urban setting for students to study in. Approximately 15,000 students are enrolled per year at University of Missouri - Kansas City.

Students may pick from a few areas of study, including but not limited to:

  • Liberal Arts And Sciences
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Communications And Journalism

Students applying for admission are asked to submit an application, transcripts, test scores and any requested application essays, which will then be reviewed by admissions staff. A SAT or ACT exam is required prior to applying, with scores between 960 - 1350 for the SAT exam and between 20 - 27 on the ACT is common among students admitted to this school. 56% of students that apply are accepted to this school, of which 50% choose to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found here.

Tuition & fees at UMKC vary for in-state and nonresidents. In-state tuition costs around $9,900 per year with out-of-state tuition costing $23,000 for the year. University of Missouri - Kansas City may provide financial aid for students that qualify as scholarships, grants, and loans.

The University of Missouri - Kansas City Kangaroos participate in several intercollegiate athletic programs, overseen by the NCAA. Athletic programs available:

  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Golf (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Soccer (NCAA Division I-AAA)

Students who would like to see more about University of Missouri - Kansas City may check out their website at http://www.umkc.edu/.

Acceptance Rate

61.3

Student to Faculty Ratio

15:1

The University of Colorado Denver (UCD or UC Denver) is a public research university with two campuses in Colorado - its Auraria Campus in Denver, and its Anschutz Medical Campus in nearby Aurora, Colorado. The UC Denver is one of the largest employers in Colorado, thanks in part to its University of Colorado Hospital and University Physicians, Inc.

The UC Denver offers more than 130 degree programs, including undergraduate degrees as well as graduate degrees at the master's and doctoral levels. It also awards professional degrees. The UCD has the only medical school in the state and the largest graduate business school. UCD has high research activity with its research programs primarily dedicated to medicine and health sciences.

History

UC Denver was founded in 1883 as the Department of Medicine and Surgery that was located at the Boulder Campus of the University of Colorado. In 1898, it opened its Department of Nursing. In 1892, the classes for these programs were moved to Denver, where more opportunities for practical learning experience existed. The movement of the medical departments from Boulder to Denver caused a series of political battles over where to locate these programs. By 1911, the School of Medicine had merged with the Denver Gross Medical College and developed a more comprehensive program in Denver. In 1925, the School of Medicine moved to a new campus location in Denver that later became the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. With the subsequent reshuffling of an army medical center, and renaming of the health and medical programs many years later, the UC Denver health sciences schools were relocated to the army base and became the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center at what is now known as the Anschutz Medical Campus.

Another branch of the University of Colorado Denver was established in 1912 as an Extension Center of the University of Colorado. This department of "correspondence and extension" grew over the years and moved locations several times, finally becoming the University of Colorado at Denver in 1974. In 2007, the university's name was refined to "University of Colorado Denver," comprised of its Downtown Campus and its Anschutz Medical Campus (University of Colorado Anshutz Medical Campus).

Academics

The academic calendar for the University of Colorado Denver follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Architecture and Planning
  • College of Arts & Media
  • Business School
  • School of Dental Medicine
  • School of Education and Human Development
  • College of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Graduate School
  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • School of Medicine
  • College of Nursing
  • School of Pharmacy
  • School of Public Affairs
  • Colorado School of Public Health

Student Life

More than 100 student clubs and organizations are available at the University of Colorado Denver, including professional groups, honor societies, and religious, political, social and service groups, among others. The student-run newspaper, the Advocate, is an opportunity for journalism students and others to get involved. Intramural sports include basketball, soccer, volleyball, tennis, and squash.

The UCD lecture series offers students the opportunity to hear from renowned guest speakers. Many other events and opportunities for recreation and entertainment are available.

Campus housing is available at the Campus Village on the Auraria Campus.

Traditions

The University of Colorado school colors are black and gold, and the school mascot is a buffalo named "Ralphie."

Athletics

The University of Colorado "Buffaloes" compete in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The University of Colorado Denver is comprised of two campuses - its downtown Denver Campus, which is officially named "Auraria Campus," and its Anschutz Medical Campus.

Community Life

Denver, Colorado offers visitors and students much to see and do. UC Denver's downtown campus (Auraria Campus) is near high-rise buildings of downtown Denver in the Theatre District. The Anschutz Medical Campus is in nearby Aurora, and offers easy access to the University of Colorado Hospital and The Children's Hospital.

There are many nice neighborhoods around both campuses, in nice tree lined metro areas. There is a good network of bicycle paths, as well as rail and bus systems. The area is renowned for its skiing, with plentiful snowfall in the ski areas.

Cultural events in the community include the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo, the sporting events of the Denver Broncos, and the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, to name a few.

Acceptance Rate

67.31

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Nova Southeastern University (NSU) is a private research university that includes graduate and professional schools on its campus in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. NSU offers over 40 undergraduate degree programs, and many more graduate degree programs at the master's and doctoral levels.

NSU is known for its excellent faculty who are still actively engaged in their professional careers in the field as well as their teaching careers. NSU is also notable for the fact that more African American and Hispanic students earn their doctoral degrees there than any other university in the nation.

NSU offers excellent facilities and cutting-edge technology, and a beautiful, 300-acre campus setting.  It is nationally recognized for its graduate and professional training programs, as well as for its distance learning programs, with field-based programs located in Florida and 23 states, as well as in a number of international sites.

History

Nova Southeastern University was founded in 1964 as "Nova University." It began as a very small school focusing primarily on the physical and social sciences.  In 1994, Nova University merged with Southeastern University of Health Sciences and became Nova Southeastern University. The school has grown to become the nation's seventh largest independent university, and its programs now include law, education, business computer science, oceanography, medicine, pharmacy, optometry, and more.

Academics

Nova Southeastern University's academic calendar follows the semester format, with fall and winter semesters.  Summer classes are available.

Colleges, Schools and Centers

  • Center for Psychological Studies
  • College of Allied Health and Nursing
  • College of Dental Medicine
  • College of Medical Sciences
  • College of Optometry
  • College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • College of Pharmacy
  • Criminal Justice Institute
  • Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
  • Fischler School of Education and Human Services
  • Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences
  • Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  • H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
  • Human Services Unit
  • Mailman Segal Center for Human Development
  • Oceanographic Center
  • Shepard Broad Law Center
  • University School


In addition to its colleges, schools and centers, NSU has several research and professional education institutes that include:

  • Brief Therapy Institute
  • Criminal Justice Institute
  • The Eye Institute
  • Guy Harvey Research Institute
  • Hudson Institute of Entrepreneurship and Executive Education
  • Huizenga Sales Institute
  • International Institute for Franchise Education
  • The Language Institute
  • Lifelong Learning Institute
  • National Coral Reef Institute
  • Rumbaugh-Goodwin Institute for Cancer Research

Student Life

More than 70 student clubs and organizations are available on the NSU campus.  There is also a strong student government program, several active fraternities and sororities, and intramural sports, among other activities.  More information about how to get involved in a campus program is available at the NSU Office of Student Leadership and Civic Engagement.

In addition, the Campus Recreation Department offers many on-campus fitness and wellness classes such as spinning and Pilates, among others.

Student housing is available on campus, all rooms with private bathrooms and wireless Internet service, and there are many on-campus dining services available as well.

Athletics

The "Sharks" athletic teams of Nova Southeaster University compete in 17 intercollegiate sports, with 10 women's and 7 men's teams that include:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Track and Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main, Fort Lauderdale-Davie Campus in Florida, NSU has satellite campuses at the following locations:

  • East Campus, Fort Lauderdale, FL (six miles from the main campus)
  • Oceanographic Center Campus, Dania Beach, FL
  • North Miami Beach Campus, North Miami Beach, FL

In addition to its satellite campuses, NSU has several "Student Education Centers" that allow students to study through a combination of online learning, video conferencing and onsite access to NSU staff and learning resources.  NSU has Student Education Centers in the following locations:

  • Nassau, Bahamas
  • Fort Myers, FL
  • Jacksonville, FL
  • Miami, FL
  • Miramar, FL
  • Orlando, FL
  • Palm Beach, FL
  • Tampa, FL

Community Life

South Florida has a very warm, temperate climate that makes it easy to enjoy outdoor recreation. The areas around NSU offer opportunities to enjoy hiking, biking fishing, boating, windsurfing and concerts and festivals.  There are beaches, or the Florida Everglades, within 15-30 minutes of the main campus.  Many sports arenas, restaurants, shopping spots and entertainment venues are available in the area.

Acceptance Rate

80.1

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Renton Technical College, located in Renton, Washington, was founded in 1942 and is one of the 34 colleges that are operated by the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges in Washington State. The school is dedicated to workforce development in the Renton area, providing specialized training programs in a variety of subjects. The school has seen increased growth since its founding, particularly after the Second World War, where many veterans were looking for job training upon their return. Today the school enrolls a large number of students from a variety of areas, and is dedicated to providing them with the best education possible to ease their transition into the workforce.

Academics

Renton Technical College offers a large variety of programs aimed at meeting the needs of the community and providing students with the skills and knowledge to operate in their chosen field as qualified professionals. Programs take between one and two years to complete, resulting in a certificate or degree that demonstrates competency and allows for entry into the workforce at the entry level. Courses are both classroom and practical, with practical courses allowing for the perfections of methods and techniques in a supervised and controlled setting. The school's ties to the community, particularly for economic development, means that many of the programs offered are reflective of the needs of the community, allowing individuals to seek employment within their community and fill positions that are in high demand.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid

Renton Technical College is a two year, open enrollment institution that allows any individual seeking to enroll to do so by completing an application and paying all accrued fees.  Interested students should also provide standardized test scores and transcripts, and may be subject to a placement exam based on program enrollment. Students should also meet with a counselor to discuss program options and curriculum.

Financial aid is available in the form of loans and grants. Students in need of financial assistance must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the information from which will be used by the school to develop a financial aid packet based on the student's need and aid program eligibility. Aid must be reapplied for prior to the start of each academic year. Students may be asked at random to supply additional financial information to compare to the FAFSA and certify its accuracy as part of recent government regulations governing the disbursement of public funds.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

City College - Miami, a nonprofit private institution, offers a large number of program options, allowing students to choose which major is right for them. Located in Miami, Florida, the school offers an urban setting for students to study in. City College - Miami, with only about 400 students enrolled, offers smaller class sizes and hands on instruction as part of its commitment to students.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs City College - Miami offers:

  • Business Administration
  • Emergency Medical Technology
  • Law and Justice Administration
  • Medical Insurance Coding
  • Medical Assistant

To be considered for admissions, students may be required to complete an application, write a personal statement, and submit school transcripts, which are then reviewed by the admissions committee.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is close to $15,000, but may change from year to year. Students are encouraged to visit the school's tuition calculator to better estimate their cost of attendance. This school may help with costs by offering financial aid for students who are eligible as grants and loans.

Students may take a look at the school's http://www.citycollege.edu to view additional information.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

15:1

City College - Fort Lauderdale, a nonprofit private institution, offers a large number of degree programs, allowing students to choose which major is right for them. Located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, it offers an urban setting for students to study in. The school's limited space in terms of enrollment, around 800 students, offers students a more hands on education due to class size and ease of access to professors.

Areas of study offered at City College - Fort Lauderdale include:

  • Nursing
  • Radio And Television Broadcasting
  • Medical Insurance Coding
  • Law and Justice Administration
  • Business Administration

The admissions process will include the submission of an application, student records, and standardized test scores, which are then evaluated by the admissions office.

Tuition is approximately $15,000 for the year, though it may vary based on different types of circumstances. Students may check the school's net price calculator to get a more personalized estimate of costs. This school may offer financial aid for students that are eligible by way of grants and loans.

Students should visit the website to see a complete list of programs offered, admissions information, and more.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

8:1

Whatever kind of student you are, Columbia State Community College is the great place to start with.

Columbia State is a 2-year college with five campuses located in Columbia, Lawrenceburg, Lewisburg, Franklin and Clifton. It is a member of the sixth largest higher education system, the Tennessee Board of Regents serving the southern Middle Tennessee area.

The school has a variety of educational options offering over 50 areas of study for all. If you are a degree-seeking student, choose from the 2-year degree programs and follow it by either immediately getting a job or going on to a 4-year university. If you are skill-seeking student, earn a certificate or improve your professional skills from its programs. Working students may take advantage of its distance education or online classes for flexibility. Temporary students may enroll at its evening programs for transfer or other purposes and take non-credit classes for fun or developing new skills. High School students have the option to earn college credit while they are still in high school.

Columbia State takes pride of their expert faculty and friendly staff who will make sure you have great college experience and assist you in reaching goals. Be active and be involved in many of their extracurricular learning.

It also organizes cultural events, extended services and opportunities for the 9 counties it serves. It is giving back to the community which has been supportive of the school.

With these excellent academic offerings and student services, Columbia State Community College is indeed the great place to start with.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

College of DuPage (COD) is a two-year community college located on a 273-acre campus in Glen Ellyn, Illinois. COD is one of the largest single-campus community colleges in the U.S. In addition to its main campus in Glen Ellyn, COD has six regional centers. It offers more than 45 associate's degree and pre-baccalaureate transfer programs, 59 occupational degree programs, and 90 certificate programs.

COD also offers basic adult education, English as a Second Language (ESL), and continuing education.

In addition to its transfer, degree and certificate programs, COD offers a wide variety of Special Interest programs, which offer opportunities to follow alternative learning formats or programs for increased personal and professional enrichment. Special Interest programs at COD include:

  • Adult Fast Track - an accelerated program for working students with busy lifestyles
  • COD Online - distance learning in more than 36 disciplines
  • Cooperative Education and Internships - providing on-the-job experience
  • Field and Experiential Studies - unique credit courses that include field-based learning
  • Flex - self-directed courses as an alternative to classrooms or online learning
  • Global Scholars - a curriculum of GSP-designated courses and a foreign language
  • Honors Program - highly motivated students take enhanced courses for more challenge
  • Learning Community - enroll in courses connected by a common theme
  • International Education - intercultural experiences are the focus
  • Study Abroad - travel abroad to complete a short or long program
  • Office of High School Partnerships - high school students can pursue dual enrollment
  • Service Learning - blending classroom learning with community involvement
  • Vocational Skills - challenging courses for students with mild cognitive impairment

History

The College of DuPage was founded in 1967. Also in 1967, the school established its newspaper, The Courier. The campus-based radio station, WDCB 90.9 FM, was founded in 1977. The campus-based literary magazine, Prairie Light Review, was founded in 1982.

Academics

The College of DuPage offers nine different Associate's degrees.

The academic calendar of the College of DuPage follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer "sessions."

Colleges and Schools

As a two-year community college, COD's academic units are divided into divisions, rather than colleges and schools. Its academic divisions are:

  • Business and Technology
  • Continuing Education / Extended Learning
  • Health and Sciences
  • Learning Resources
  • Liberal Arts

Student Life

The College of DuPage offers nearly 50 student clubs and organizations on campus, providing students a connection to academics, personal interests, or social activities. There are many opportunities for practicing leadership and professional skills through the various groups and programs available.

Many student services are also available, and the College of DuPage Library is an excellent student resource with its collections of books, microfiche, video, and more.

The renowned McAninch Arts Center at College of DuPage enriches student entertainment on campus, offering more than 200 educational, visual, cultural and artistic events and performances annually.

Traditions

The school colors are green and gold, with white as a third color. The school mascot is the chaparral bird (common name: roadrunner).  The school's athletics department is traditionally referred to as "Chaparral Country."

Athletics

The College of DuPage has had a highly successful community college athletic program for more than 20 years. The COD "Chaparral" athletic teams compete in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cheer Team
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field

 Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cheer Team
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

College of DuPage has Regional Centers at:

  • Addison
  • Bloomingdale
  • Carol Stream
  • Naperville
  • West Chicago
  • Westmont

Community Life

College of DuPage offers a variety of community services, providing opportunities for entertainment, culture, education and employment. Several academic departments offer affordable services such as Dental Hygiene Appointments, Cosmetology Appointments, Free Ultrasounds, fitness classes at the Community Recreation Center, and assistance at the Child Care Center. The Plants Plus program in the Horticulture Department offers low-cost bulbs, plants, yard art, and more.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

21:1

North Seattle Community College, located in the city of Seattle, is an urban student’s paradise and a fantastic starting place for those looking to acquire a 2-year degree with guaranteed acceptance into a state college. NSCC offers pre-college programs that include GED testing and ESL, as well as the opportunity to earn an array of associate’s degrees and career training in over 50 certificate programs. With over 14,000 students enrolled each year, NSCC has a robust and thriving student life that includes a symphonic band, theater, self-published literary/art magazine, art gallery, and espresso bar. The cost to attend North Seattle Community College is $107.00 per credit hour for in-state residents. The cost for out-of-state students is $279.00 per credit hour. NSCC also offers a wide array of services to its students, such as: childcare, tutoring, career services, counseling, internship location assistance, disability services, student leadership training, and multicultural programs. Applying to North Seattle Community College is simple and easy. Prospective students can complete their applications online or in-person. All tuition and fees can also be paid in full online or in-person on campus. NSCC is also currently offering programs for international students who wish to pursue an education in the United States. These programs include help with English as a second language. Students who reside in America can also take advantage of NSCC’s study abroad program. If you are interested in attending North Seattle Community College or would like to learn more, click here to access their official web site.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

About
Durham Technical Community College, located in Durham, North Carolina, was founded in 1961 and was originally Durham Industrial Technical Institute. Within four years the school changed its name to Durham Technical Institute to as the focus and offerings of the school expanded. The name was again changed in 1986 when the school was approved to offer university transfer programs, resulting in the name it has today. The school is one of the charter members of the North Carolina Community College System which oversees operations of all two year public institutions in the state.

Academics
Durham Technical Community College offers a number of programs that serve the needs of its current and future students. Career and technical programs allow students to pursue an education in an industry or field, receiving training and skill development that allows for entry into the workforce as a qualified professional. Programs take between one and two years to complete and result in a certificate or associate degree. Academic transfer programs mirror the first two years of a four year program, followed by having the student transfer to a college or university to complete the final two years and earn their bachelor's degree.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid
Any individual interested in enrolling at DTCC may do so by completing the application for admission and paying all fees. Students must be 18 years of age or have a high school diploma, and should supply transcripts and SAT or ACT scores if possible. Meeting a counselor prior to registration is also encouraged. Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants and scholarships which are awarded based on need as determined through the student's Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) is comprised of several college campuses and learning centers that are located throughout the Pittsburgh area of Pennsylvania. CCAC offers more than 170 programs in career certificates and vocational training, associate degrees, and a range of college transfer studies. The four CCAC college campuses and six learning centers in different communities offer flexible scheduling and many online courses.

The college transfer programs at CCAC are very successful, with thousands of CCAC students transferring each year to the college of their choice. Many of the career training programs at CCAC can be completed in six months or less, including the fast-growing "green" jobs. Academic programs cover everything from nursing to social sciences and information technology.

CCAC has developed its workforce training division into a top-notch, sales-oriented enterprise that works with the regions employers and economic development officials. The Center for Professional Development is now a trainer of choice in southwestern Pennsylvania for:

  • Corporate & Agency Training
  • Professional Continuing Education
  • Public Safety
  • Federal, State, County and Local Agency Training

History

CCAC was founded in 1966 with an initial enrollment of just over 1,500 students. In 1966 there were two campuses - the campus on Pittsburgh's North Side and a suburban campus at Boyce Campus in Monroeville.  South Campus was established in 1967, and moved its present complex in West Mifflin in 1973.  North Campus was established in 1972 and moved to its permanent location in McCandless in 1990.

Six centers were created as satellite learning centers for the four main campuses beginning in 2001.

Academics

The academic calendar for CCAC follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. Online classes are also available, which may allow for some non-traditional enrollment periods throughout the year.

Colleges and Schools

The academic units for CCAC are organized into departments, divisions and centers.

Student Life

CCAC offers its students more than 100 clubs and organizations to become involved in beyond the classroom. Additional opportunities for involvement on campus include several honor societies, intramural sports, cultural events, student government, and four different student-run newspapers: the Allegheny View, Boyce Collegian, North Voice and South Forum.

There are many student services available on CCAC campuses, including career planning, counseling and support services. Career fairs and job events are hosted throughout the year, and childcare centers allow students with children to attend classes throughout the school year.

Traditions

The traditional school colors for CCAC are red and white. The school mascot is a cougar, and the athletic teams are nicknamed the Allegheny "Cougars."

Athletics

The Allegheny Campus of the Community College of Allegheny County has four collegiate sports teams. These teams include men's and women's basketball, bowling, golf and cross country. Allegheny students seeking more information about any of these teams should contact the Athletic Office at: (412) 237-2503.

The other campuses in the community college district have other sports available. Students should contact the campus of their choice for more information.

Satellite Campuses

The Community College of Allegheny County has four campuses and six centers in the Pittsburgh area.

  • Allegheny Campus
  • Boyce Campus
  • North Campus
  • South Campus 

Additionally, CCAC currently has six centers located throughout Allegheny and Washington Counties.

  • Bethel Park Center
  • Braddock Hills Center
  • Downtown Center
  • Homewood-Brushton Center
  • Washington County Center
  • West Hills Center

Community Life

CCAC offers community education programs through non-credit, fee-based classes. Classes and programs include workforce training and personal enrichment courses in a range of areas including foreign languages, fitness and health, business, computer technology, cooking, music and dance. Community classes are available to adults and children.

The Green Institute at CCAC is run as a community initiative with a goal of operating as a partner and trainer of choice to businesses in the area who have joined the "green" movement. Programs in the CCAC Green Institute focus on five environmentally-friendly areas: consumer education, credit programs leading to green jobs, practical training, a speakers' bureau, and kid's programs.

More than 90% of CCAC graduates choose to live and work in the local region. Additionally, the affordability and accessibility of CCAC has enabled more than 40% of its students to attend college.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC) is a two-year community college that emphasizes technical training. MATC has four major campuses in the Milwaukee area. Each of the four campuses offers 200 programs that lead to an associate's degree, technical diploma or professional certificate. Some programs are offered in an accelerated format for students who have less time available to complete their programs.

Students can choose an occupational program with credits that count towards a future bachelor's degree, or complete the first half of a bachelor's degree via the Liberal Arts and Sciences program. Many students take classes for personal enrichment, to upgrade their job skills, gain new skills, or apprentice in a trade. Students may also attend MATC to earn a high school diploma, GED or HSED.

Classes are available during the day, in the evening, on weekends and online.

Students at MATC receive targeted, practical instruction and training for their career of choice. More than 80 percent of graduates find employment within six months of graduation or successfully continue on to four-year colleges and universities.

MATC faculty members have extensive professional experience in their occupational fields. Students at MATC benefit from hands-on teaching, smaller class sizes and individual attention.

History

Milwaukee Area Technical College was founded in 1912 as the Milwaukee Continuation School, located in the Manufacturers' Home Building in Milwaukee. Classrooms at this location became overcrowded, leading to the construction of a permanent school on State Street. Eight years later, construction of the school was completed and the school was renamed the Milwaukee Vocational School.

Evening classes have been offered from the beginning, and there has always been an emphasis on technical classes and "practical learning" taught by industry professionals.

The school has grown over the years to become one of the largest community-based technical colleges in the Midwest.

During World War II, the Milwaukee Vocational School was turned into a training center for defense workers. The Army Signal Corps set up a training unit on campus. The school ran day and night, seven days a week, facilitating the entry of large numbers of women and African Americans into the industrial workforce for the first time. When the war ended, returning servicemen flooded the traditional apprentice programs. The influx of adult learners led the college to change its name to Milwaukee Vocational and Adult School in 1948.

After WWII, Milwaukee Vocational School developed a series of technical programs that led to the school's transformation into the Milwaukee Institute of Technology in 1951.

Academics

The academic calendar for Milwaukee Area Technical College follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

The academic units at Milwaukee Area Technical College are divided into six divisions:

  • Business
  • Media and Creative Arts
  • Health Sciences
  • Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Pre-College Education
  • Technology and Applied Sciences

Student Life

There are more than 50 student clubs and organizations on the MATC campuses. There is a District Student Board (DSB) that provides support for district wide groups. The Office of Student Life can provide assistance with how to find or join a student organization.

Traditions

The school colors for Milwaukee Area Technical College are blue and white, with gold as an accent color. The athletic teams are nicknamed the MATC "Stormers."

Athletics

The MATC "Stormers" are part of the North Central Community College Conference. The "Stormers" athletic teams compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Golf
  • Soccer 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball 

Satellite Campuses

In addition to the Downtown Milwaukee Campus, MATC has the following satellite campuses:

  • Mequon Campus
  • Oak Creek Campus
  • West Allis Campus

Community Life

MATC was created in response to community demand for technical training of workers in the region, and that commitment to the community continues. MATC provides training, skills advancement and enrichment courses for community members. Its offering of courses in the evenings, on weekends and at varied times is to provide community members greater access to learning.

In the past 20 years, the Hispanic community in the Milwaukee area has increased, leading to changes in teaching methods and curricula at MATC. Working with its Office of Bilingual Education, MATC launched an series of bilingual courses for Hispanic students, aimed at workforce development. Bilingual programs are available in several career choices, including Office Assistant, Nursing Assistant, and Phlebotomy. MATC also provides condensed Spanish language courses for service professionals needing bilingual skills.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) is a two-year college comprised of three primary campuses and two satellite campuses in Maryland.CCBC also offers distance learning programs, and more than 100 academic degree and certificate programs. CCBC offers excellent transfer programs for students planning to transition into four-year universities to complete their bachelor's degrees.

High-achieving students at CCBC can join one of the honors programs to gain enhanced learning experiences and guaranteed admission to a four-year college or university. CCBC has affiliations with many four-year institutions, including Loyola College, College of Notre Dame, Towson University, and more.

Academic resources for students at CCBC include academic advising, international study and travel programs, developmental education, service learning, learning communities, a career training center, and job placement services, among others.

History

The Community College of Baltimore County was founded in 1957. The Catonsville branch originally operated out of the Catonsville High School basement. The college got its own campus in Catonsville in 1962. The Essex branch originally operated out of Kenwood High School. It got its own campus in the 1960s. In 1970, CCBC founded its Dundalk Campus.

Academics

The academic calendar for CCBC follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters and a series of shorter summer sessions. There is also a short 3-week winter session available.

Colleges and Schools

  • School of Applied and Information Technology
  • School of Business, Social Sciences, Wellness and Education
  • School of Health Professions
  • School of Justice
  • School of Liberal Arts
  • School of Mathematics and Science
     

Student Life

At CCBC, campus involvement in student clubs and organizations is encouraged to foster "co-curricular learning." The mission and purpose of the Student Life Program at CCBC is: "To provide a comprehensive program that provides cultural, social, recreational, health and wellness, and an intellectual environment for all."

Student clubs, organizations and activities cover a broad range of interests, including fine arts, performing arts, sports, pop culture, student government, horticulture, and philosophy, to name a few.

Student services at CCBC include tutoring, counseling, advising, testing, career training, and more.

Athletics

CCBC offers athletic programs at all three of its primary campuses: Catonsville (Cardinals), Dundalk (Lions) and Essex (Knights). Students should contact the athletics department at each campus to find out which sports programs are based there. CCBC men's and women's athletic teams compete in intercollegiate sports at the state, regional and national levels.

Intercollegiate athletics at CCBC include:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Lacrosse         
  • Soccer 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

CCBC is comprised of three primary campuses and two satellite campuses in Maryland. The three primary CCBC campuses are:

  • CCBC Catonsville
  • CCBC Dundalk
  • CCBC Essex 

The two CCBC satellite campuses are:

  • CCBC Owings Mills Extension Center
  • CCBC Hunt Valley Extension Center
  • CCBC Randallstown Extension Center 

The CCBC Distance Learning program provides easy-access alternatives to commuting to one of the campuses.

Community Life

CCBC offers many programs to the community. Programs that benefit local businesses include training for businesses, such as food safety, health care, workplace literacy, applied technology, and command Spanish, among others. Community education is available for life enrichment, adult literacy, children and young adults, career training, internships, and more. Performing arts productions are available to community members through the Catonsville Community Theatre Company, the Dundalk Community Theater, Senior Start Showcase, and the theatre, dance and music departments.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

15:1

Wayne County Community College District (WCCCD) is a two-year community college serving the metropolitan and rural areas of Detroit, Michigan. The College has six campuses that are located in industrial, rural and metro areas where the State's technical and skilled occupations are concentrated. WCCCD provides college transfer programs in liberal arts for those students hoping to transfer to a four-year institution to complete a bachelor's degree. WCCCD, which has more than 90 academic programs, places a very strong emphasis on its occupational and professional career certificate programs.

Wayne County Community College District has recently added new programs, improved its offering of student services, and has upgraded its facilities and technology. Improvements at WCCCD include:

  • Expanding Programs and Courses Based on Market Needs and Student Demands
  • Capital Improvement Program: Building for the Future
  • National Summits and Conferences
  • Instructional Delivery: Making Education Accessible
  • Special Initiatives
  • Community Events and Programs: Lifelong Learning
  • Workforce Development Partnerships
  • Professional Institutes and Services
  • Seamless Transition from High School to College
  • Award Winning Marketing Programs
  • Community Leaders Participation and Guidance
  • Student Scholarship Fund: Education for Empowerment
  • Widely Recognized Academic and Non Academic Programs

History

Wayne County Community College District was established in 1967 and opened its doors in 1969. When it was founded, the college did not have its own buildings or facilities. Instead, classes were held in local public schools and buildings in Wayne County.

Academics

The academic calendar for Wayne County Community College District follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

The academic units at WCCCD are divided into programs and divisions, rather than into colleges and schools.

Student Life

Student activities are available at each of the WCCCD campuses, and cover social, political, academic, recreational and cultural interests.

Students at WCCCD benefit from a wider range of services than ever before, all designed to help them achieve their academic, personal, and professional goals. The Student Services staff at WCCCD will help guide students in choosing the correct program to meet their goals, whether they are to earn a professional/vocational certificate, to meet the requirements for transfer to a four-year university or for lifelong enrichment.

Academic advisors and staff in the Career Planning and Placement offices will help students choose their classes. Student Services are available at all five WCCCD campuses.

Traditions

The traditional school colors for Wayne County Community College District are blue and white. The mascot is the "wildcat" and the athletic teams are nicknamed the WCCCD "Wildcats."

Athletics

The WCCCD "Wildcats" athletic teams compete in men's and women's basketball, among others.

Satellite Campuses

Wayne County Community College District offers online learning as well as onsite learning, and is comprised of six campuses, including:

  • Downriver Campus
  • Downtown Campus
  • Eastern Campus
  • University Center
  • Northwest Campus
  • Western Campus

Community Life

The motto of WCCCD is: "Where learning leads to a better life." This motto carries over into the local community, where many events and initiatives from WCCCD are designed to serve students as well as the public. Some recent WCCCD sponsored or partnered events are the Adoption Festival, Hispanic Heritage Festival, Chancellor's Reading Carnival, International Taste Festival, Bridge to Asia, Passport to Africa, Family Learning Day, School Safety Summit, Spring Book Festival, Global Speaker Series, Global Women's Conference, and more.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

25:1

Oklahoma City Community College, located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is a public two year institution which began development after the voter of Oklahoma City recognized the need for a junior college in the area. By 1972 the school was officially opened, after groundbreaking and construction began for the campus. At the time the school was known as South Oklahoma City Junior College and had enrollment of a little over a thousand students. In 1983 the school changed its name to the current to better reflect its role as a college and its service to the community. Today the school serves over 28,000 students a year, providing them with academic and career training opportunities.

Academics

Oklahoma City Community College provides a large number of programs for students and the community. Such programs may result in an associate degree or certificate and focus on either career training or academic advancement. Career training programs prepare students for entry into the workforce, providing the skills and knowledge necessary to function in the field of study chosen. Certificate programs tend to lack the general education requirements of an associate degree, and thus are shorter. Academic students will complete the first two years of a four year education, and if prerequisites are met, will transfer to a four year institution to complete their bachelor's degree. OCCC also offers adult education and continuing education courses for individuals who wish to return to the classroom for personal growth or professional development.

Programs offered at OCCC include:

Admissions and Financial Aid

Students who wish to enroll at Oklahoma City Community College must be 18 years of age, a high school graduate or equivalent, and have met high school curricular requirements. The school has specific deadlines for each semester, and applications must be received prior to the deadline in order to be considered for a specific semester. Students must also supply all pertinent transcripts. Financial aid is available in the form of loans and grants. Students in need of aid may visit the school's website or financial aid office to obtain the forms necessary to be considered for financial aid. Scholarships are also available, having requirements set forth by the scholarship's overseeing body and distributed based on the scholarship's intended intent.

Clubs and Organizations

Students at Oklahoma City Community College are encouraged to participate in one or more of the clubs available at the school. Clubs and organizations provide students with the opportunity to meet individuals with similar interests, possibly forming social bonds that may extend beyond the school and past graduation. Some clubs will provide opportunities to participate in leadership roles, while others will host activities and events for club members as well as others. Oklahoma City Community College also encourages students to form their own clubs if a club does not exist that reflects his or her interests. An application process is in place and the guidelines for operating a club are available through the school or online.

OCCC clubs and organizations include:

  • Science Club
  • Health Professions Club
  • Engineering Club
  • Mathematics Club
  • Kappa Beta Delta – Honors

Recreation and Fitness

Oklahoma City Community College, also maintains recreational and fitness related facilities and activities to promote good health. Students and employees are encouraged to participate in the programs provided, as they provide an enjoyable atmosphere and foster maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The school provides swim lessons, summer camps for youths, fitness classes and a super sprint triathlon. Additional information and calendar dates are available online and are updated regularly each semester.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

25:1

South University was founded in 1899 by John Draughon, and was known as the Draughon' Practical Business School until the name was changed to South College in 1985 to reflect its new ownership by John T. South. The name was changed later to South University when the school became accredited to offer masters and doctoral degrees. South maintains a large campus in Savannah Georgia, with smaller campuses located in Texas, South Carolina, Alabama, Michigan, Virginia, and Florida. The school is dedicated to providing a quality education to its students, constantly reviewing and updating programs as needed.

Academics

South University offers associate, baccalaureate, master and doctoral degrees in several fields. The programs reflect the demand of industry in today's economy. The programs vary in length based on the degree pursued. The choice of programs in high demand fields is to ensure that graduates will be able to pursue careers in areas with little difficulty. The varying levels of degrees reflect what is possible, with higher level degrees typically pursued by experienced individuals wishing to take the next step in their career. The various programs also reflect the growing need for professionally trained individuals in their respective industries, as the marketplace grows so does the demand for skilled and talented individuals.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid

Students interested in attending South University should request additional information through the website then submit the included application for enrollment. An admission officer will assist in the completion of the application and provided a tour of the campus. Financial aid is available and a South University financial aid officer will assist in identifying financial opportunities and requests. Financial aid is available in the form of loans and grants. Students will be asked to complete forms regarding their or their family's income, after which a determination will be made regarding the awards disbursed by the school and which type of aid given. Scholarships may also be available for interested students. Scholarships may be given for criterion other than need as determined by the overseeing body of the scholarship, and as such typically require a separate application to be considered.

Career Services

South University's office of student affairs assists students by providing a variety of services. These include testing and orientation for new students, programs and extracurricular activities for current students, and job placement services for graduates. The office of student affairs is an active part of student life on campus, and operates several facilities available, including the bookstore, counseling and student organizations. Students in need of assistance at South University may find help through the office, as well as opportunities for a career in the future.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

10:1

How to Become an Anesthesiologist Assistant

A degree for an anesthesiologist assistant will provide students with the knowledge and skill necessary to assist in the treatment of pain through medication before, during, and after surgery. A student wishing to pursue anesthesiologist assistance major will first need to earn a bachelor's degree in a pre-medical field such as biology or chemistry. Once a qualifying degree has been earned, the student will enter an anesthesiologist assistant master's program from an accredited college or university.

Students in a master's degree program will take upper-level courses plus be required to complete clinical rotations in an approved medical facility. During this timeframe, students will learn how to take patient histories, learn about various anesthetics, the delivery and recovery from such anesthesia, and how to monitor the effects of various anesthesia throughout myriad surgical procedures.

Earning Your Anesthesiology Assistant Degree

A curriculum in anesthesiologist assistance may include a variety of classes in the biological and chemical sciences. The curricular design with depend on the university and their teaching pedagogy, accreditation, and resources. Examples of classes you can expect to see include:

Where Do Anesthesiology Assistants Work?

Anesthesiologist assistants will work under the supervision of an anesthesiologist, typically in a hospital or clinical setting. Individuals pursuing a career in as an anesthesiologist assistant will be responsible for taking patient histories and observing the effects of medication and anesthesia on the patient.  During the course of surgery, an assistant will administer the anesthesia as prescribed by the anesthesiologist. Assistants will do well to note any complications and changes in a patient's condition, immediately reporting such changes to the supervisor and offering corrective remedy when necessary.

Do Anesthesiology Assistants Need to Be Licensed?

Anesthesiologist assistants must obtain licensure depending on the state. Nearly half the states in the union require some form of licensure, with 6 states allowing work specifically ascribed to anesthesiologists to be performed by assistants while under the supervision of a licensed anesthesiologist.  To learn more about the licensure requirements in your state of residence, simply visit the National Commission for Certification for Anesthesiologist Assistants (NCCAA).

How Much to Anesthesiology Assistants Make?

The average anesthesiologist assistant salary is approximately $94,000 per year.  The job outlook for AA's is rated as 'Excellent' as the BLS estimates a growth rate of 37% over the coming decade which is well above the 6% average for all jobs during that time span.  Job opportunities are expected to grow faster than average over the next decade as the population ages and the need for medical professionals at all levels increases in demand.  Anesthesiologist Assistant salaries will vary by organization type (clinics, hospitals, medical centers, research facilities), the scope of work, experience, and the geographic location of the employer as larger metro areas tend to pay more than their rural counterparts.   

Individuals interested in anesthesiologist assistance may also be interested in degree programs such as medical assistance, pharmacy technician, and physical therapist assistance.  Additionally, you may be interested in extending your learning in the field after graduation by joining a regional or national association such as the American Academy of Anesthesiologist Assistants (AAAA) and the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).

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