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What is Toxicology?

Toxicology is an interdisciplinary branch of medicine, biology, and chemistry focused on the adverse effects of chemicals on living systems.  The field of toxicology also analyzes the negative effects of physical, biological, and chemical agents in a biological system and the associated damage in a living system.

A toxicologist will spend extensive time understanding the correlation between dosage and reaction(s) on an organism given variables such as gender, age, species, health, individual characteristics, and environment. Thus, having an extensive background in biology and anatomy couples with pharmacology is a vital asset to any toxicologist.

Career Summary

MEDIAN SALARY

$80,530

PERCENT ABOVE NATIONAL
INCOME AVERAGE

53.98%

TOTAL SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

107,900

Degree Median Salary vs Adjacent Degree Types

Source: BLS, US Census, and IPEDS

2021 Best Toxicology Degree

Columbia University in the City of New York is a private research university in Manhattan, New York. Columbia University is the fifth oldest institute of higher learning in the U.S., founded before the American Revolution, and is an "Ivy League" university. A member of the Association of American Universities, Columbia University was the first school in the U.S. to confer an M.D. degree. It was also the first site in the United States where the uranium atom was split. Other "firsts" that came out of Columbia include the birth of FM radio, the laser beam, the first use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), among many more pioneering inventions and patents.

Columbia offers degrees at the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels, as well as professional degrees, in a comprehensive range of academic fields. It is ranked number one as a research university by the Center for Measuring University Performance. It shares first place in rankings with MIT and Stanford University. Columbia University receives fourth ranking overall among other universities in the nation, according to the U.S. News & World Report.

Columbia University has a particularly illustrious list of alumni, boasting more Nobel Laureates than any other educational institution in the world. Since 1901, when the Nobel Prizes were first granted, 79 Columbia University alumni, faculty, researchers and administrators have won the Nobel Prize. The first recipient was Theodore Roosevelt in 1901 (Peace), and the most recent was President Barack Obama in 2009 (Peace).

There are renowned Columbia alumni in nearly every career field, including nine Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, 29 Heads of State, 25 Academy Award winners, more than 100 American Academy of Arts and Sciences Award winners, at least 30 MacArthur Foundation Award winners, more than 40 National Academy of Sciences Award winners, and many more.

History

Columbia University in the City of New York was founded in 1754 by royal charter of England's King George II. It was founded as "King's College." It closed during the American Revolution, and reopened after the war in 1784 as "Columbia College." In 1857, Columbia College moved from its original location at Park Place, to 49th Street and Madison Avenue. It remained in this location for more than 40 years. In 1897, the school moved to its present location in Morningside Heights in Manhattan. Architect Charles Follen McKim designed the buildings at the new Morningside Heights Campus in a Roman classical or Athenian style. Many newer buildings now surround the original buildings on campus.

Academics

The academic calendar for Columbia University in the City of New York follows the semester format, with fall and spring "terms." There is also a Summer Study Abroad program in various locations, as well as several "Special Programs" abroad. The academic schedules for these programs vary, and further information should be obtained from the program administrators.

Colleges and Schools

Undergraduate students at Columbia University attend Columbia College (Liberal Arts degrees), The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (Engineering and Applied Sciences degrees), or The School of General Studies (nontraditional Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees) on the Morningside Heights campus. Undergraduates will also have access to affiliated institutions such as Teachers College, Barnard College, the Union Theological Seminary, and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, as well as the Julliard School.

The colleges and schools of Columbia University in the City of New York include:

  • Columbia College
  • School of General Studies
  • School of the Arts
  • School of Continuing Education
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • School of International and Public Affairs
  • Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation
  • School of Social Work
  • Graduate School of Journalism
  • School of Engineering and Applied Science
  • School of Law
  • Graduate School of Business
  • College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Public Health
  • College of Dental Medicine

Student Life

There are numerous student groups and organizations at Columbia University in the City of New York, including the many fraternities and sororities that are active on campus. There are also many co-educational Greek organizations available. Greek Life has been active on the Columbia campus sine 1836. 

In addition to various academic, social, political, religious and military student organizations, there is a campus organization representing and supporting lesbian, gay and transgender students.

Community Impact (CI) is a non-profit community service organization on campus that involves Columbia students in assisting the disadvantaged communities of Morningside Heights, Washington Heights and Harlem.

On-campus housing is available, guaranteed for enrolled undergraduates. Residence halls are located at Columbia College, Hartley Hall, Wallach Hall, Livingston Hall, John Jay Hall, Furnald Hall and Carman Hall. Apartment-style housing is available in the surrounding neighborhoods.

Students at Columbia can enjoy some of the many performances from campus groups including the Columbia Players, King's Crown Shakespeare Troupe, Columbia Musical Theater Society, Black Theatre Ensemble, and the Columbia University Marching Band, among others.

Traditions

The Columbia University school colors are blue and white. The blue is a light blue commonly known as "Columbia Blue."

The school mascot is the lion.

An old tradition at Columbia University is "Orgo Night," a custom that involves the Columbia University Marching Band playing music around campus for 45 minutes, beginning at the stroke of midnight, on the eve of final exams to distract students from studying for their Organic Chemistry final exam.

Another old tradition, which began prior to the American Revolution, is the lighting of the Yule Log. A troop of "soldiers" dressed as the Continental Army, carry the Yule Log from the campus Sun Dial to John Jay Hall, where it is lit as people sing Christmas carols and read aloud from traditional Christmas books.

Athletics

The Columbia University "Lions" athletic teams compete in 29 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Football
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The Morningside Heights Campus in Manhattan (New York, New York) is the primary campus for most graduate and undergraduate studies. This campus occupies more than six city blocks. The campus will soon expand into "Manhattanville," a neighborhood north of its current location. This new expansion will extend the Columbia campus into West Harlem, with new buildings housing programs for business, arts, and some of the sciences.

Columbia University Medical Center Campus is considered its second campus, and houses all of the health-related schools for the University. The Medical Center Campus is located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, 50 blocks north of the Morningside Campus. There are many hospitals nationwide and abroad associated with Columbia University's medical-health schools, and in New York these are New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York State Psychiatric Institute, the Payne-Whitney Clinic, and the Payne Whitney Westchester, among others.

A third campus for Columbia University is its Lamont-Doherty Campus, located in Palisades, New York, on the west bank of the Hudson River. This campus supports geologic and oceanic research, including seismic activity.

A fourth campus in Irvington, New York, supports the Nevis Laboratories.

There are additional Columbia University facilities throughout New York, and a satellite learning site in Paris, France, among others.

Community Life

New York City is a world-famous metropolis with many historic landmarks and sites, made up of many communities. Students attending any of the Columbia University campuses in the New York area will have easy access to all that the "Big Apple" has to offer, thanks to an excellent transport system.

Acceptance Rate

5.45

Student to Faculty Ratio

6:1

Cornell University is one of the top, public research universities in the United States. Located in Ithaca, New York, Cornell is the State's Land Grant University. As such, it is dedicated to transferring and applying university-based knowledge for practical benefits and economic prosperity in the State.

Research at Cornell is cutting-edge, with research programs being highly interdisciplinary. The academic excellence of Cornell's programs is widely known, as is its renowned faculty. The Cornell programs receiving the highest reviews include its Social Sciences, Life Sciences, Humanities, Sustainability, Law and Technology, Information Science, International Programs and Weill Cornell Initiatives.

Cross college collaborations are the norm at Cornell, encouraging and enabling explorations into new areas that include genomics, advanced materials and nanoscience. There are countless options for majors and minors at Cornell, and students can pursue a course of study that marries diverse interests.

The Liberal Arts at Cornell are as vital as the sciences, with top programs in literature, art history, theatre, dance and music.

History

Cornell University was founded in 1865 as New York State's Land Grant institution. Two founders, Ezra Cornell and Andrew D. White, wanted to establish an institution that married scientific and technical education with instruction in history and literature. Cornell University opened in 1867 with Andrew White as its first president. The goal then, to be the best at whatever it undertakes, continues today.

Academics

The general academic calendar for Cornell University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. There is a 3-week Winter Session in January, and the summer semester is divided into three short sessions.

Colleges and Schools

Cornell University has seven undergraduate colleges in addition to its graduate school and professional schools. There are also specialized faculty units at Cornell, and nearly 100 academic departments offering a variety of programs. Academic units at Cornell include many centers, institutes and laboratories as well, and interdisciplinary programs, research and study units that help make Cornell distinctive.

Undergraduate Colleges:

  • College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
  • College of Architecture, Art and Planning
  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • College of Engineering
  • School of Hotel Administration
  • College of Human Ecology
  • School of Industrial and Labor Relations 

Special Faculty Units:

  • The Faculty of Computing and Information Science 

Graduate and Professional Colleges and Schools:

  • Graduate School
  • Cornell Law School
  • S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management
  • Weill Cornell Medical College (New York City and Doha, Qatar)
  • Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences (New York City)
  • College of Veterinary Medicine 

School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions

Student Life

There are more than 500 student clubs and organizations at Cornell University, covering myriad interests for its diverse student body. For students interested in engaging in public service and social action, there are many opportunities available through the Cornell Public Service Center (PSC). Local chapters of sororities and fraternities are very active, offering additional opportunities for academic success, community involvement and networking.

Cornell offers a range of options for on campus living, from undergraduate and graduate housing on campus to residential initiatives and community centers.  Faculty leadership is part of the residential initiatives, enhancing the first-year residential experience. There are themed living communities that offer students the chance to live in a place where they can learn more about their interests, such as music, languages, cultures and more.

On campus dining offers a wide range of choices from dining halls to cafes, and off campus eateries in Ithaca offer a diverse range of options.

Traditions

The traditional colors for Cornell University are red and white. These colors were established in 1868 on the banner used for decoration at celebrations for the University's Inauguration Day.  The football team has been nicknamed "Big Red" since the early days.

In 1898, the general manager for the Campbell Soup Company attended a Cornell University football game. He was so impressed with the red and white uniforms worn by the Cornell athletes that he insisted the design for Campbell's Soup labels be changed to red and white. The soup cans have had the iconic red and white labels since that time.

The Cornell University mascot is a bear. A university student wears a bear costume and, as "Big Red," performs for the crowds at varsity athletic events.

Athletics

The Cornell University "Big Red" athletic teams compete in 36 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Polo
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Sprint Football
  • Squash
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Equestrian
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Gymnastics
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Polo
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

Cornell University has one primary campus in Ithaca, New York, but has medical schools in New York City and Qatar. It also offers the Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) programs in 62 counties of New York State, including all five NYC boroughs. The goal of CCE programs is to make the Cornell academic experience and research widely available to improve lives and communities. Programs include agriculture, environment, community development, nutrition and health, and more.

Community Life

Although Ithaca, New York is a college town and often associated with young people, recent news articles have touted Ithaca as the ideal town for retirees. The median home prices are relatively low and retired people can take classes at Cornell University or Ithaca College. There are many activities available for you and old alike, including speeches, concerts, and sports events, day hikes along scenic trails to waterfalls and gorges, and bicycle paths throughout the Finger Lakes region. The Museum of Earth is just one of the many interesting organizations that are available to the public in this idyllic university town full of culture and stimulation.

Acceptance Rate

10.85

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

The University of California, Berkeley has a reputation of excellence, boasting many renowned graduates and faculty members.  In fact, 20 UC Berkeley faculty members have received Nobel awards.  According to a National Research Council analysis, UC Berkeley has at least 48 highly ranked graduate programs, making it one of the top 10 universities in the nation.

The UC Berkeley campus is known nearly as much for its colorful history of political and social activism as it is for its exemplary academics.  Its attractive campus features Sproul Plaza, Campanile Tower, Lawrence Hall and Doe Library, among other architectural landmarks.

The University of California, Berkeley is also known as "UC Berkeley" or simply "Cal."

History

In 1849, when California first became a state, those drafting the State Constitution added a clause for establishing a university that would "contribute even more than California's gold to the glory and happiness of advancing generations."  This aspiration led to a merger in 1868 of the private College of California in Oakland, California with a state-legislated land grant that included the Agricultural, Mining and Mechanical Arts College and land parcels in both Oakland and Berkeley, California.  The governor of California signed into law the Organic Act allowing for the creation and organization of the "University of California."

The University of California was officially founded in 1869 with a group of 10 faculty members and 40 students on its first campus in Oakland, California.  In 1873, the University of California moved to a new campus in Berkeley.  After much debate over its mission, governance and curricula, the State Constitution of 1879 guaranteed the University of California some independence to organize and govern itself via its Board of Regents with only limited oversight by the state legislature.  This structure of governance would lead to periodic debates through the years between the regents, state governor and legislators, campus chancellors, faculty members and students.

In 1914 the University of California, Los Angeles was established, initiating the statewide UC System that today has 10 campuses across California.  The University of California, Berkeley is considered the flagship institution of the UC System.

Academics

The academic calendar of the University of California, Berkeley is based on the semester system.  UC Berkeley offers more than 350 different degree programs, in one of its 14 colleges and schools, ranging from Aerospace Studies and Art History to Urban Design and Women's Studies.

The academic year at UC Berkeley is divided into two semesters, fall and spring, and one Summer Session.  If you have earned quarter units at another institution that you wish to transfer to UC Berkeley, they can be converted to semester units by multiplying by two-thirds (i.e. 180 quarter units is equal to 120 semester units).

Colleges and Schools

The University of California, Berkeley is comprised of 14 colleges and schools, which are:

  • College of Letters and Science
  • Haas School of Business
  • College of Chemistry
  • Graduate School of Education
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Environmental Design
  • School of Information
  • Graduate School of Journalism
  • School of Law
  • College of Natural Resources
  • School of Optometry
  • School of Public Health
  • Richard & Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy
  • School of Social Welfare

Student Life

Student organizations abound at UC Berkeley, with hundreds available to connect students to community, share talents and develop their group building and leadership skills. The Center for Student Leadership offers assistance with student organization recognition, recruitment and retention, as well as campus publicity and event planning for different groups.

UC Berkeley's Center for Student Leadership also provides programs that provide leadership development models and theories.  Individual or group coaching is available, in addition to workshops, team building and challenge course initiatives.

The Cal Corps Public Service Center has many volunteer or internship programs that connect people, ideas and resources to activism in the areas of social justice, community health and public service.

The Cal2Action.Berkeley.edu program offers online resources that connect UC Berkeley students to countless community volunteer programs such as Berkeley After School Program Volunteers, The Music Connection and Youth Impact, among others.

Fraternities and Sororities

There is a thriving "Greek Life" on campus at UC Berkeley with more than 60 recognized chapters of fraternities and sororities.  The "Cal Greeks" have a 140-year tradition at UC Berkeley, and students seeking a common ground for leadership, scholarship, friendship and service can choose from a diverse selection of sisterhood or brotherhood chapters.

Traditions

The California Golden Bears, or Cal Bears, sports teams are known throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.  You will hear many traditional Cal Bears songs and cheers when attending any sporting event at UC Berkeley.  The UC Berkeley Rally Committee is charged with the responsibility of guarding and protecting the universities traditional songs and cheers.

Athletics

UC Berkeley is well known for its Cal Bears sports teams, rally and spirit groups, and more than nine spectator sports facilities.  You can log onto CalBears.com, the official site of the California Golden Bears intercollegiate athletics.  The site includes sports news, schedules and ticket sales, traditions, boosters clubs and more.

There are many club sports and recreational activities available at UC Berkeley, in addition to intramural sports.  Intramural sports include leagues for a variety of indoor and outdoor sports such as basketball, soccer, softball, volleyball and tennis.  The Cal Sports Club provides instruction, competition and recreation in 25 sports and activities open to all Cal Recreation Club members.

Satellite Campuses

There are many adult education and continuing education classes offered through the UC Berkeley Extension program.  The extension courses are taught at satellite campuses in Berkeley and San Francisco, California and many courses or certificate programs are available online.

The programs of study available through UC Berkeley Extension include Art & Design, Behavioral & Health Sciences, Business, Computer Technology, Education, Engineering, Humanities, Sciences, Sustainability Studies, Writing, Editing and Technical Communication.

Community Life

There is plenty to do on and off the campus of University of California, Berkeley.  The UC Berkeley website provides a searchable calendar of campus events that include art exhibits, music performances by established artists from around the world, weekly noon concerts, comedy nights and many other forms of entertainment.

Many listings for entertainment and news can be found in the Daily Cal, an award-winning, independent newspaper run by students since 1871.  Other news outlets include The Berkeleyan, a weekly newspaper from staff and faculty, as well as podcasts and the KALX student-run campus radio station.

Several popular dining spots are located on the UC Berkeley campus, including Ramona's Café, Pat Brown's Grill, The Terrace Café, The Golden Bear and the Free Speech Movement Café, an eatery and study spot that features a wall exhibit and events that offer a forum on timely political and social issues.

Acceptance Rate

16.25

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

Originally established in Detroit in 1817, the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor is Michigan state's oldest public university. It serves as the main campus for the University of Michigan, with regional campuses located in Dearborn and Flint. There are over 9,000 faculty members in 200 departments across all campuses.

U of M in Ann Arbor spans over 600 acres in combined area and has four main sections known as the North campus, South campus, Medical campus, and Central campus. All four areas house thirteen undergraduate and eighteen graduate schools and colleges in total.

The University of Michigan is also recognized as one of the top public universities worldwide and holds one of the highest budgets among research universities in the country. Its Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) alone has over 1,000 students and over 600 faculty members involved.

In direct collaboration with the U of M Medical School is the University of Michigan Health System consisting of three hospitals, 120 outpatient clinics, and several centers for medical research and learning. Its C.S. Mott Children's Hospital is known to be one of the best children's hospitals in the country.

Famous for its success in football and ice hockey, the U of M is represented by the Michigan Wolverines in intercollegiate athletic events. Sports activities are overseen by the Department of Recreational Sports. Other student organizations in the university include the Pops Orchestra, Men's Glee Club, and the Musical Society which is made up of the Choral Union and the University Orchestra.

Student housing within university grounds is the sixth largest in the country, providing room for over 12,000 students. The university is also home to a golf course, a number of museums, galleries, planetariums, the Nichols Arboretum, and the Matthaei Botanical Gardens.

Acceptance Rate

22.91

Student to Faculty Ratio

11:1

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill or "Carolina") is just one of 16 public universities in North Carolina.  It is located in the charming college town of Chapel Hill.  One of the most highly regarded institutions of higher education in the United States, "Carolina" ranks high for its academic quality, affordability, diversity, social engagement and international presence.

Consistently ranking among the top five or six U.S. universities for the quality of its research programs, research faculty at "Carolina" consistently attract strong funding for their work. Faculty garnered more than $800 million in research contracts and grant funding in 2010.

Many undergraduate and graduate programs at UNC-Chapel Hill receive high marks. Receiving particularly high marks are the school's city and regional planning programs, MBA, healthcare management and nursing programs, and its School of Public Health, School of Medicine, School of Education and School of Law.  UNC-Chapel Hill is also noted for its excellent creative arts programs, producing many great visual artists, actors, dancers, musicians and writers over the years.

History

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered the same year that George Washington was inaugurated as president (1789), and first opened its doors to students in 1795.  It was the nation's first public university, and also the only one to award degrees in the 18th century.

Academics

The UNC-Chapel Hill's academic calendar follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters and a summer session.

Colleges, Schools and Centers

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • School of Dentistry
  • School of Education
  • Eshelman School of Pharmacy
  • Friday Center for Continuing Education
  • General College
  • Gillings School of Global Public Health
  • Graduate School
  • Kenan-Flagler Business School
  • School of Government
  • School of Information & Library Science
  • School of Journalism & Mass Communication
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Social Work
  • Summer School

Student Life

Students at Carolina can get involved in the more than 600 student groups, clubs and organizations available that focus on politics, the arts, public service, recreation, academics, research, and much more. The university magazine and online blog, Blue & White, is one of many ways for Carolina students to connect. There are also numerous journals and other media outlets available on campus to help students keep up with the news or become involved.  Many cultural events and performances are available on campus year round.  Campus recreation includes fitness classes, intramural sports and many adventure trips.

Campus housing is available, along with numerous on-campus dining options.  Student health services are available, as are academic services, and many other resources that are accessible via MyUNC.

Traditions

The mascot of Carolina's "Tar Heels" is the ram. The white ram's antlers are traditionally painted light blue to represent the university's colors of white and light blue.

Athletics

UNC-Chapel Hill's athletic program produces some of the top college athletes in the country, and the Carolina "Tar Heels" men and women's teams compete in 28 sports.

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Community Life

Chapel Hill is situated in the rolling, wooded hills of North Carolina.  It is located three hours from the Blue Ridge Mountains and equidistance from the Atlantic coast.  Chapel Hill is one of three points in The Research Triangle, an area that is noteworthy for being a top location to live, do business and conduct scientific research. The other two "points" in the "triangle" are the cities of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina.  The area is considered by many publications to be one of the best places to live in America.

Acceptance Rate

22.63

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

University of Rochester is a nonprofit private institution located in Rochester, NY and provides a large number of educational opportunities for students. Approximately nine thousand students are enrolled annually at University of Rochester. A list of some of the more popular programs offered are:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Social Sciences
  • Psychology
  • Visual And Performing Arts
The admissions process begins with the submission of an application, student records, and test scores, which are then evaluated by the admissions office. Most common test scores among students admitted to University of Rochester are between 28 to 32 on the ACT, or 1860 to 2140 on the SAT exam. University of Rochester admits around 40 percent of students applying. Of those students admitted, around 24 percent of students enrolled. More information from the admissions office can be found at enrollment.rochester.edu. The cost of undergraduate tuition is around $46,000, but may change yearly. Students are encouraged to visit the school's net price calculator to better estimate their cost of attendance. The price of on-campus housing is about $8,100 per year. This school may help with costs by offering financial aid for students who qualify as loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs. The mascot for University of Rochester is the "Yellow Jackets", and they participate in intercollegiate athletics through oversight by the NCAA. Athletic programs available may include:
  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division III)

Acceptance Rate

29.71

Student to Faculty Ratio

10:1

UM's pride lies not only in being Maryland state's flagship university but also in having over a hundred of its academic programs consistently ranking among the best in the country. The University of Maryland boasts of several schools and colleges including those of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism, the Robert H. Smith School of Business, and the A. James Clark School of Engineering. Both summer and winter short-term programs include opportunities to study in numerous locations abroad, some of which are either partly or fully-sponsored.

The College Park Scholars and Women in Engineering (WIE) are among the more notable programs being offered at the university. WIE was enacted to encourage support for and the growth of the number of female students in the field of engineering, both in the undergraduate and graduate levels. The Scholars program, on the other hand, invites qualified students to participate in what are called "living-learning programs", covering areas of study such us Global Public Health, Life Sciences, and Public Leadership.

Testudo, a representation of a Diamondback terrapin, stands as the official mascot and symbol of good luck that is present at different college athletic events. The school's landscape features the famous Memorial Chapel and its carillon, the McKeldin Mall sundial and fountain, and the bronze sculpture of alumni Jim Henson with his famous creation, Kermit.

Traditions on campus have been prevalent since its establishment as the Maryland Agricultural College in 1856. Maryland Day for instance, held on the last Saturday of April, marks an open-house event to which prospective students and members of the surrounding communities are invited in joining the university's staff, faculty, and student body in various festivities. UM is located, specifically, within Prince George's county near Washington, DC.

Acceptance Rate

44.18

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

The University of Georgia (UGA) is a highly diversified research university located in Athens, Georgia.  There are many international students at UGA, as well as nationals and locals from within the state of Georgia.

The UGA offers bachelor's, master's, doctoral and professional degrees in a broad range of majors including the arts, humanities, social sciences, biological sciences, physical sciences, agricultural and environmental sciences, business, ecology, environmental design, family and consumer sciences forest resources, journalism and mass communication, education, law, pharmacy, public health, social work and veterinary medicine.

There are many continuing education students at UGA, and the university encourages economic and social development as well as community involvement through its experiment stations and programs in public service and technology transfer.

History

Georgia was the first state in the U.S. to charter at state-supported university in 1785. Studying a curriculum of traditional classical studies, the first class graduated in 1804. The curriculum expanded in 1843 to include law, and much later to include agriculture and mechanical arts. Through the years, sixteen colleges and schools were established within the UGA to provide programs in teaching, research and service.  Today, the UGA is part of the University System of Georgia, and governed by the board of regents.

Academics

The UGA follows the semester academic calendar, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

There are 22 bachelor's degrees offered at UGA with concentrations in 140 fields. The university offers 34 master's degrees (124 concentrations), and nearly 20 Educational Specialist degrees.  There are four different doctoral degree designations (Ph.D., Ed.D., D.M.A. and D.P.A.) offered in 91 areas.  Professional degrees at UGA include law, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine.

UGA also offers more than 170 Study Abroad or Foreign Exchange programs.

The university's OASIS program allows you to register for classes, view class schedules and student-related information online.

UGA also has several Distance Learning degrees and certificates including a Master of Education in Adult Education and graduate-level certificates in Pharmacy, among others.  The UGA offers "e-Learning" programs in various departments with Web-based classroom materials and an online learning management system.

Colleges and Schools

The University of Georgia has 16 schools and colleges offering many degree programs, including some interdisciplinary options.

Schools and Colleges at UGA:

  • Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Arts and Sciences
  • Business
  • Ecology
  • Education
  • Environment and Design
  • Family and Consumer Sciences
  • Forestry and Natural Resources
  • Graduate School
  • Journalism and Mass Communication
  • Law
  • Pharmacy
  • Public Health
  • Public and International Affairs
  • Social Work
  • Veterinary Medicine

Student Life

UGA requires its first-year students to live on campus through their first academic year to get the complete university experience.  There are many residence halls to choose from among several campus communities: Brumby Community, Creswell Community, East Campus Village, Hill Community, Myers Community, Reed Community and Russell Community.

There are many programs available to UGA students that encourage involvement and participation on campus.  The Office of Multicultural Services and Programs celebrates its diverse population and people of color by promoting student leadership and academic achievement.

UGA has many facilities for student health and recreation, including recreational sports and the GORP program, which offers special excursions in hiking, climbing, riding, rafting sailing, and more, for students of all levels.

The Office of Student Affairs has information about the many student groups, clubs, societies and organizations that students can participate in.

Fraternities and Sororities

There are 59 national fraternities and sororities at UGA, and "Greek Life" has been a strong tradition at the university for more than 150 years. The Greek groups at UGA organize and coordinate many annual events and provide leadership for many educational and community programs.

Traditions

The University of Georgia has a long history of traditions, many of which have been made famous in books and movies.  The school's athletics teams have been named the "Bulldogs" since the school was founded and many news reports about sports games at the UGA have made the Bulldogs high profile.  The UGA mascot bulldog, named "Uga," appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine, and in the movie "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil."

Another tradition at the UGA is the ringing of the chapel bell on campus after a Bulldog football team victory.

There is an Arch located on the Northern section of the University of Georgia campus that freshman were traditionally forbidden to walk under.  Although this tradition is no longer enforced, some freshmen still honor the tradition.

Athletics

The University of Georgia's intercollegiate athletics programs ranks among the top 10 in the U.S.  Its Bulldogs teams have won national championships for the past several years in many sports including women's gymnastics, men's tennis, women's swimming and diving, tennis, equestrian and golf.  The women's basketball team is referred to as "The Georgia Lady Bulldogs."

Intercollegiate Sports at UGA:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Equestrian
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The University of Georgia's main campus is in Athens, Georgia, and offers undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees through its 16 schools and colleges.  The UGA also offers many undergraduate and graduate degrees, and continuing education programs through its satellite campuses elsewhere in Georgia:

  • UGA Gwinnett Campus
  • UGA Griffin Campus
  • UGA Tifton Campus
  • UGA Terry College of Business

Community Life

Community outreach and service is a large part of the University of Georgia's mission.  The UGA has a long history of service to Georgia, and has many public service programs that allow students to work in communities throughout the state on economic development, K-12 education, leadership, professional education and training, as well as research for state agencies.

The community of Georgia, Athens provides ample opportunities for students to find entertainment and explore. There are many art galleries and music and theatre performances on and off campus. The attractive downtown area of Athens offers numerous shops, restaurants, cafes and taverns, helping to make this one of the "Best College Towns" in the United States.

Acceptance Rate

45.3

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

North Carolina State University at Raleigh (NC State) is ranked in the top 50 U.S. public universities, and number three in the U.S. among public universities that receive funding for research.  Research is a foundation of the academic culture at NC State, and 70 percent of the university's faculty conduct research. Many graduate students are supported by research funding.

NC State has its primary campuses located in Raleigh, North Carolina, which is considered one of the best places to live and work in the U.S.  The university's campuses - Main Campus (comprised of South, Central, North, West and East campuses) and Centennial Campus - are located in a region that boasts some of the country's top technology, research and pharmaceutical companies.

Known as "the People's University," NC State is the largest university in North Carolina, with more than 8,000 faculty and staff.  Since many of its classes are large, the university has a policy of providing smaller discussion groups and labs so students get more learning opportunities.  NC State has established the North Carolina Cooperative Extension, which provides research-based information to statewide communities.

History

Established in 1887 and opened in 1889, North Carolina State University began as the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts.  In the 1900s, the school established the Cooperative Agricultural Extension Service at State College, which led to many more extension programs, research and outreach work and, eventually, to an official name change.  The curricula expanded greatly over the years, moving far beyond agriculture and mechanic arts to offer all major academic disciplines and to receive top ranking in a number of disciplines.

Academics

NC State has 12 colleges and schools offering all major academic disciplines. Through its history, NC State has been a leading university in agriculture, forestry, wood and paper science, engineering, textiles, veterinary medicine and design. It is also strong in all the sciences, including nanotechnology, biotechnology, biomedical engineering, and computer science.  NC State also has strong departments in the humanities and social sciences and mathematics, among others.

NC State's state-of-the-art research programs are among its highlights, offering students the opportunity to work on campus and off with leading researchers in many fields. NC State has made many important research discoveries, with roughly 660 patents to its credit. Some of NC State's "firsts" include the prototype for the artificial retina, and the first synthetic aorta.

Colleges and Schools

The 12 colleges and schools of NC State University are:

  • College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
  • College of Design
  • College of Education
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Poole College of Management
  • College of Natural Resources
  • College of Physical Mathematical Sciences
  • College of Textiles
  • College of Veterinary Medicine
  • First Year College
  • Graduate School

Athletics

The NC State University's athletics teams are known as the "Wolfpacks" or "Packs" for short. North Carolina State University teams have won two NCAA national championships and two AIAVV titles, among others.  NC State competes in 23 intercollegiate sports.

The school also offers 45 different club sports to NC State students, including 18 intramural leagues for all skill levels.

Student Life

Known as the "People's College," NC State has more than 400 organizations and activities for students to get involved in.  The myriad categories include:

  • Arts & cultural activities
  • Academic organizations & honorary societies
  • Service groups
  • Graduate student associations
  • Peer group, lifestyle & diversity initiatives
  • Political & social action groups
  • Professional & career support
  • Religious & spiritual organizations
  • Special interest opportunities
  • Sports, recreation & leisure activities
  • Student governing boards
  • Student media & publications

There are also many leadership opportunities through NC State's service-learning programs and community service initiatives that integrate community work with academics.

Year-round arts and entertainment programs and activities are also available for students and faculty.  There are arts organizations and exhibits, on-campus cinema, media outlets, theatres, crafts centers, dance performances, music performances and the summer TheatreFest.

The Division of Student Affairs at NC State offers support and services to students through many extracurricular recreational activities.

There are many choices for on-campus housing at NC State including residence halls at East, West and Central campuses.  There are also the "Living and Learning Villages," which are residence halls devoted to grouping students with similar lifestyle or academic interests.  The Wolf Village Apartments, Western Manor and E.S. King Village are conveniently located off-campus apartment complexes for married students.

Fraternities and Sororities

There are many fraternities and sororities open to students on the NC State campus.  There are local chapters of national organizations as well as many "social" groups who are involved in a variety of leadership, service, academic and social activities.

The school has issued a warning that the Zeta Psi fraternity has been suspended from the university for being found responsible for hazing and alcohol violations, among other infractions.

Traditions

Holladay Hall, which was built in 1889, was the first campus building for NC State and is still considered its "main building."

The "Free Expression Tunnel," a tunnel that connects two halves of NC State's Central Campus, was established in the 1960's as a place where students could express themselves through wall graffiti.

NC State's school colors are red and white, although the original school colors were pink and blue.

The school mascot became the "Wolfpack" in 1922 after its students were described as behaving like a "wolf pack" at sporting events.

An NC State student wrote the words to the school's fight song in 1926:

NCSU Fight Song
Shout aloud to the men who will play the game to win
We're behind you, keep fighting for State---
Hold that line, hold 'em fast,
We'll reach victory at last
We're behind you, keep fighting for State---
Rise up to the fray and let your colors wave,
Shout out for dear old N.C. State --GO STATE!
And where-e'er we go,
we'll let the whole world know,
We're behind you, keep fighting for State.

Community Life

NC State is a land-grant institution and, as such, it encourages and promotes community involvement in every department through extension programs, engagement initiatives, economic development efforts and many partnerships with outside organizations.

Acceptance Rate

45.13

Student to Faculty Ratio

14:1

About Clemson University, located in Clemson, South Carolina, was founded in 1889 through a donation of land and resources by Thomas Green Clemson upon his death. Mr. Clemson had desired to establish a scientific agricultural and mechanical arts institution in the model of whats is now Mississippi State University.

The donation by Mr. Clemson was almost denied by the state, passing by one vote, and founding what was then known as Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina. Originally the school was an all white, male, military institution, becoming civilian and coeducational in 1955, and admitting its first African-American student, future Charlotte mayor Harvey Gantt, in 1963.

By 1964 the school had changed its name to Clemson University to better represent its expanded and redefined role as an educational institution in South Carolina. Today the school serves almost 20,000 students a year.
Academics Clemson University offers a large number of programs through its five colleges, resulting in a bachelor's, master's or doctoral degree. Bachelor degree programs typically take four years to complete and may be accompanied by a minor degree. Minor degrees allow for additional education in a separate field, allowing students to pursue secondary interests or augment their major through a related field of study.

Graduate programs have separate requirements for admission, including excellent academic performance, the appropriate undergraduate or graduate degree, and high scores on a graduate level exam such as the GRE or LSAT. As mentioned above, the school offers programs through its five colleges: Agriculture, Forestry and Life Science; Architecture, Arts and Humanities; Business and Behavioral Sciences; Engineering and Science; and Health, Education and Human Development.
Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid Admission to Clemson University is highly competitive. The school places a high emphasis on academic performance in high school, as well as standardized test scores. Other factors taken into consideration are extracurricular activities, class rank and a student's personal statement.

Once an application is submitted, it will be reviewed by the university and compared to the applications of others, with a final decision rendered as soon as possible, and notification sent to the student shortly thereafter. If admitted, the student will receive information regarding the start of their academic career at Clemson College, including housing, registration procedure and a variety of other topics.
Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs. Students in need of financial assistance must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the resulting student aid report (SAR) from which will be used to determine financial need, aid program eligibility, and monetary awards.

Prospective students may be asked to provide additional financial information prior to the disbursement of funds to ensure the information in the SAR is accurate. Financial aid must be reapplied for prior to the start of each semester and within the deadlines set by the school.
Athletics The Clemson University Tigers compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I through the Atlantic Coast Conference. Intercollegiate athletics provide students a forum for healthy competition and allows them to experience the camaraderie that comes with success and failure among a group working toward the same goal.

Additionally, such activities assist students in developing skills and habits that are beneficial in one's personal, academic and professional life. These include discipline, teamwork, and good health. Athletic programs have varying start dates throughout the year and interested students should contact the athletic department to obtain tryout dates and times. Students who are admitted into a program must be prepared to commit their free time to train and prepare.
Athletic programs at Clemson University:

  • Baseball (Men Only)l
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Diving (Women Only)
  • Football (Men Only)
  • Golf
  • Rowing (Women Only)
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball (Women Only)

Acceptance Rate

51.26

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities is located in St. Paul/Minneapolis and is a public research facility.

History

Though the University of Minnesota was founded on February 25, 1851, no students were welcomed within its halls until 1867. Enrolment was detained because of the American Civil War, as well as financial challenges. However, in 1867, John Sergent Pillbury, a University regent, state governor and senator, loaned the school a sizeable sum and used his political position to allow it to become the recipient of a Morrill Land Grant. The first president, William Watts Folwell was inaugurated on December 22, 1869. The First Bachelor Degree was awarded in 1873. In 1888, Doctor of Philosophy degrees were awarded.

The original Minneapolis campus was located on the Mississippi River, overlooking St. Anthony Falls. It was upgraded to a college from a preparatory school in 1869.

Minneapolis Campus

Today, the University's Minneapolis campus is located on both banks for the Mississippi River; the East Bank being the main campus. East Bank is divided into five areas. They are:

  • The Athletic Area
  • The Gateway Area
  • The Health Area
  • The Knoll Area
  • The Mall Area

The West Bank first saw major development during the 1960s. West Bank Art Center consists of:

  • The Barbara Barker Center for Dance
  • Ferguson Hall
  • Regis Center for Art
  • Ted Mann Concert Hall
  • Rarig Center

St. Paul Campus

The St. Paul Campus of the University of Minnesota Twin Cities is located in the Falcon Heights Suburb. Social Sciences and the College of Food are located here. The Washington Avenue Bridge over the Mississippi allows students easy access between the East and West Banks. Gopher way tunnels allow students access to some buildings during inclement weather. The University has its own law enforcement in and around campus for student safety.

Academics

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities is compromised of sixteen colleges and schools. Examples include:

  • College of Biological Sciences
  • College of Design
  • College of Food, Agriculture and National Resource Sciences
  • College of Veterinary Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Dentistry
  • Law School
  • College of Education and Human Development

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities ranks as second largest for higher education in the Midwest and offers degrees in a large variety of fields.

Athletics

The intercollegiate teams at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities are called the Golden Gophers. Goldy Gopher is the campus mascot. Teams include:

  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Hockey
  • Wrestling

Student Life

There are a wide variety of academic, cultural, entertainment and professional opportunities at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. There are over 600 co-curricular, cultural and educational organizations from which students can choose. Examples include:

  • ACLU Law Student Group
  • Adaptive Sports Club
  • Agricultural Education Club
  • AHC Multicultural Society
  • Animal Science Graduate Club
  • Biological Science Research Club
  • Black Motivated Women
  • Cardiovascular Disease Interest Group
  • Champions for Christ
  • Disabled Student Cultural Center
  • Earthquake Engineering Research Institute
  • Fisheries and Wildlife Club
  • Gophers Dairy Club

There are hundreds of others and also a wide variety of fraternities and sororities.

Local Community

There are a wide variety of art galleries and museums in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area that offer free admission.  Meanwhile, other attractions in the Twin Cities metropolitan area offer free admission, as well.  Examples in the area include free attractions such as:

  • Minneapolis Institute of Art
  • Minnesota State Capitol
  • TRACES Museum Center for History and Culture-donation requested
  • Minneapolis Sculpture Garden
  • Minnehaha Depot
  • Museum of Russian Art
  • Bell Museum of Natural History - free only on Sunday

Be sure to check out The Museum Adventure Pass, which is a free pass handed out by libraries in the Twin Cities area.

If you enjoy an adventure, be sure to visit Guthrie Theater. The building is beautiful, has glass floors and fascinating spaces. The Endless Bridge spans the spectacular Mississippi River.  From fly fishing to shopping, fun and nightlife hotspots, there is something for everyone in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area.

Acceptance Rate

56.74

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Rutgers University is the state university of New Jersey.  It is considered one of the top research universities in the nation with a history of scientific innovation. Based on its faculty's productivity, such as number of books published, grants awarded and cited articles, Rutgers is ranked quite high among other U.S. universities. It is ranked second in mathematics education, third in Italian Language and Literature, third in Women's and Gender Studies, and fifth in Global Affairs and Atmospheric Science.

Rutgers provides degree programs at the undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral levels, as well as continuing education for professional and personal advancement. Rutgers offers a variety of educational program options from elementary school students to state policymakers.  Many working professionals or busy parents can benefit from the flexibility offered by Rutgers' online courses, satellite campuses, certificate programs, professional education and lifelong learning programs.

History

Rutgers University is the nation's eighth oldest institution of higher learning and has a very rich history of innovation and leadership.  Rutgers boasts many renowned alumni that include award-winning scientists, authors, astronauts, actors, military officers, members of U.S. Congress, athletes and a vice president of the United States.

Rutgers was chartered nearly 245 years ago as Queen's College, a Dutch Reformed college created to train church clergy and also provide general education.  In 1825, Queen's College was renamed Rutgers College in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers, a hero of the revolutionary war.

Academics

At Rutgers University, students and lifelong learners can choose from diverse degree and study programs at campuses in New Brunswick, Newark and Camden.  Students can fulfill major requirements toward a degree or elect to learn about a subject of interest.  Classes are available during the days or evenings, depending on the program and location.

Rutgers University's academic calendar follows the semester system, with a fall and spring semester as well as a summer session.

Colleges / Schools

There are 27 schools and colleges on three campuses at Rutgers University, offering comprehensive degree programs at all levels as well as professional and continuing studies.

New Brunswick Campus:

School of Arts and Sciences

School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy

Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy

Mason Gross School of the Arts

Rutgers Business School - Newark and New Brunswick

School of Communication and Information

School of Engineering

School of Management and Labor Relations

School of Social Work

College of Nursing

Graduate School - New Brunswick

Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology

Graduate School of Education

Newark Campus:

Newark College of Arts and Sciences

University College - Newark

College of Nursing

Graduate School - Newark

Rutgers Business School - Newark and New Brunswick

School of Criminal Justice

School of Law - Newark

School of Public Affairs and Administration

Camden Campus:

Camden College of Arts and Sciences

University College - Camden

School of Business - Camden

Graduate School - Camden

School of Law - Camden

Student Life

Rutgers University holds an annual "Fall Involvement Fair" on its Voorhees Mall where students can learn about all the clubs and activities available to them at the university.  So numerous are the student organizations and clubs at Rutgers that they are broken down into categories: academic, cultural, media/publications, performing arts, and social and political act

Students new to campus can join one of many orientation programs to learn about the university, college life and all the activities available.  There are six different student centers at Rutgers-New Brunswick, an Olympic-sized swimming pool, a climbing well, roller hockey rink and sports facilities. 

Fraternities and Sororities

Greek life is a longstanding tradition at Rutgers University, where the first Greek letter fraternities, Delta Phi and Zeta Psi were founded in 1845. Fraternities at that time were considered subversive and forbidden by the faculty, so they continued as secret societies.

Today the fraternities and sororities at Rutgers are out in the open and there is a thriving Greek community with more than 70 fraternities and sororities on its campuses.

There are "traditional" fraternities and sororities as well as those that are historically African-American, Latino/a, Asian-interest and more.  Different chapters hold annual events that range from formal dances to social mixers and barbecues.

Traditions

There are many traditional school songs at Rutgers, dating back to 1873.  "The Rutgers History Lesson" provides an overview of the rich history of the university, as well as its Dutch heritage and participation in the American Revolutionary War.

The 1947 screen musical, "High Button Shoes," was set in New Brunswick, New Jersey and featured the school's song titled "Nobody Ever Died for Dear Old Rutgers."

"On the Banks of the Old Raritan" the Rutgers Alma Mater was created in 1847 and was first performed by the Rutgers Glee Club.

When cheering on a Rutgers athletics team, the fans in the stands will shout the traditional Rutgers cheer of "RU, rah, rah!"

Athletics

The Rutgers Scarlet Knights boast a winning football team that is the only NCAA Division I football team in the Greater New Jersey/New York area.  The football team also scores well in its academic progress.  There are many strong collegiate sports at Rutgers including women's basketball, men's baseball, soccer, wrestling, lacrosse and volleyball, among others.

In addition to its many varsity athletics, Rutgers offers numerous intramural sports leagues throughout the year.  More information on all Rutgers athletics can be found at Scarletknights.com.

Satellite Campuses

Rutgers University is made up of three campuses: Rutgers-New Brunswick, Rutgers-Newark and Rutgers-Camden.  The Rutgers-New Brunswick campus is actually made up of five campuses: Busch Campus, George H. Cook Campus, College Avenue Campus and Douglass Campus.

Community Life

The New Brunswick campus of Rutgers University has ivy covered buildings and the wide, open lawns of a historical university that dates back to 1766. The Rutgers-New Brunswick campus is situated in a lively urban area that has many art galleries, theatres and cafes, as well as nearby hiking trails, a golf course and the Rutgers Stadium.

There are many residential communities and living options on the Rutgers campuses.  A women-only residential hall is offered on Douglass Campus.  Other options include a science and engineering hall that also offers skills development programs.  There is a house for adult students who are either returning to college or entering college more than five years after finishing high school.

Acceptance Rate

61.22

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

Texas A & M University is an international island university located in Corpus Christi, Texas. It is surrounded by natural wetlands, which provide a perfect laboratory for environmental and marine sciences.

History

The Agricultural and Mechanical College was established as a land-grant college in 1871. It was the first public institution of higher learning in Texas. Students were first welcomed here in 1876.

Enrolment at Texas A & M University was restricted to men who were interested in receiving military training for the better part of its first century of operation. A requirement was to participate in the Corps of Cadets. A limited number of women were allowed to attend during this time but they were the daughters of facility and could not receive a degree. In 1918, during WWI, the senior class was called by the military to fight in France. Over 20,000 combat troops, many of them officers, were mustered out of Texas A & M during WWII.

Shortly after WWII, Texas A & M University upgraded from a college to a university. The name was changed to Texas A & M University after the war ended. At this time it became co-educational and integrated.

Near the end of the 20th Century, Texas A & M University gained recognition for its research. Designation of space grant university and sea grant university were specified at that time. In 1997, George Bush Presidential Library was established.

Academics

Students have ample opportunity to pursue career choices at Texas A & M University. The degree programs offered are ranked in the top ten nationally.

Colleges

  • College of Architecture
  • College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
  • Department of General Academic Programs
  • Mays Business College
  • Dwight Look College of Engineering
  • College of Education and Human Development
  • College of Science
  • College of Geosciences
  • College of Liberal Art
  • College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

Research at Texas A & M extends around the world. The University is renowned for world-class research facilities and a student and faculty body that is highly motivated. Texas A & M University offers more than 130 graduate programs.

Student Life

Texas A & M Student Services will allow students to have access to a supportive environment both on and off campus. Students will be learn how to hone leadership skills, to embrace diversity, be active in the campus community and assist them in realizing their educational goals successfully. There are a wide variety of fraternities and sororities on campus.

Athletics

Texas A & M University athletic teams are known as the "Islanders." The school has a physician's examination room, staff offices and state of the art equipment. Teams include:

  • Men's basketball
  • Women's basketball
  • Baseball
  • Women's golf
  • Softball
  • Cross country
  • Men's track and field
  • Women's track and field
  • Men's tennis
  • Women's tennis
  • Volleyball

Community

Corpus Christi is located on the Gulf of Mexico and is sheltered behind beautiful barrier islands. The shoreline runs for miles and is the perfect spot for sunbathers. It's also a popular haven for bird watchers. The area consists of 133,000 acres of undeveloped barrier reefs and is a treasured jewel of nature. There are a multitude of shops, restaurants and clubs along Chaparral, Shoreline and Water Streets.

The promenade and seawall offer stunning views and bikers, skaters and walkers can be found enjoying the moderate climate and scenery. Historical and cultural venues are numerous.

Be sure to take in the Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History and the Art Museum of South Texas. If you enjoy sea life, be sure to drop by the Texas State Aquarium. The Corpus Christi Botanical Gardens are beautiful year 'round for those who enjoy strolling along pathways and viewing stunning blooms.

Corpus Christi comes to life after sunset. Bars and pubs are plentiful. A favorite spot for seafood lovers is Pelican's Landing Restaurant, located on Mustang Island.

Whether you enjoy spectacular views, gorgeous sunsets, shopping, nightlife or nature, there's something for everyone in Corpus Christi.

Acceptance Rate

57.79

Student to Faculty Ratio

N.A

UMBC is a public institution located in Baltimore, Maryland and provides a large number of program options for students. Enrollment at UMBC is nearly thirteen thousand per year.

Students can choose from a few areas of study, including:

  • Psychology
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Computer And Information Sciences
  • Social Sciences

Students applying for admission are usually required to submit an application, transcripts, records, test scores and any requested letters of recommendations, which will then be reviewed by the school. Students may take either the ACT or SAT scores to be considered for admissions at University of Maryland - Baltimore County. A score in a range of 1640 to 1940 on the SAT, or 24 to 29 for the ACT is usually submitted among accepted students. UMBC has an admissions rate of around 61 percent of which only 29 percent chose to enroll. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

The cost of tuition varies for in-state and nonresidents. In-state residents pay approximately $10,000, while nonresidents pay $22,000 for the year. Student housing is available for students and costs about $6,700 annually. Some students at UMBC may qualify for financial aid, which is generally provided as scholarships, grants, and loans.

The mascot for University of Maryland - Baltimore County is the "Retrievers", and they participate in intercollegiate sports through the NCAA. Athletic programs available may include but not limited to:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Lacrosse (NCAA Division I-AAA)

Students who would like to view more about University of Maryland - Baltimore County can visit their website at http://www.umbc.edu.

Acceptance Rate

61.03

Student to Faculty Ratio

19:1

Nazareth College provides a variety of program options for students to aid them in their growth and development. The school is located in Rochester, NY and operated as a private institution. Enrollment at Nazareth College is nearly 3,300 annually.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs Nazareth College offers:

  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Education
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Psychology
  • History

Students applying for admission are usually required to submit an application, school records, standardized test scores and any requested letters of recommendations, which will then be reviewed by admissions staff. This school accepts around 70 percent of students applying. Of those admitted, about 21 percent of students enrolled. More information on admissions can be found here.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is around $30,000, but may change from year to year. Students are encouraged to visit the school's net price calculator to better understand their personal tuition costs. Housing is available for students, which costs around $6,800 per year. Students enrolled at Nazareth College may qualify for aid which is typically scholarships, grants, and loans.

This school offers a variety of athletic programs overseen by the NCAA. Sports available may include but not limited to:

  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division III)
  • Field Hockey (NCAA Division III)

Acceptance Rate

64.49

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

John Jay is a public school that has a large selection of degrees available for students to choose from. The school is located in New York, NY, in a predominantly urban area. John Jay has a yearly student enrollment of approximately fifteen thousand.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs John Jay offers:

  • Security And Protective Services
  • Psychology
  • Public Administration And Social Services
  • Social Sciences

Students applying for admission are required to submit an application, transcripts, records, standardized test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by admissions staff. The majority of students at CUNY John Jay College Criminal Justice scored in a range of 850 - 1030 on the SAT. This school has an acceptance rate of 47 percent of which only 33 percent decided to attend.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is different for in-state and out-of-state residents. In-state residents pay around $6,000 and nonresidents pay $13,000 annually. Students at CUNY John Jay College Criminal Justice may be eligible for aid which is usually loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs.

Athletic programs are available at John Jay through the NCAA, allowing students to compete in intercollegiate athletics. Athletic programs offered may include:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Soccer (NCAA Division III)

Students who wish to view more about CUNY John Jay College Criminal Justice can check out their website at http://www.jjay.cuny.edu.

Acceptance Rate

40.53

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

MSU provides a variety of educational opportunities for students to assist them in their growth and development. The school is located in Mississippi State, Mississippi and publically funded. As a land grant institution this school is one of the larger public institutions in the state of Mississippi. MSU enrolls nearly 20,000 yearly, making it one of the largest schools in the state.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs MSU offers:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Education
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Communications And Journalism
  • Psychology

To be considered for admissions, students may be required to complete an application, write a personal statement, and submit school transcripts, which are then evaluated by the admissions staff. Students may take either the ACT or SAT exam scores to be considered for admissions to this school. A score between 970 - 1235 on the SAT, or 20 - 27 for the ACT is usually submitted among admitted students. Approximately 60% of all students that applied were admitted at this school, with 47% of those accepted choosing to attend. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

The tuition at this school varies based on the state of residence of the student. In-state residents pay nearly $6,400 per year, while out-of-state residents are charged $16,000 annually. The price of on-campus housing is about $5,100 for the year. This school may help with costs by offering financial aid for students that are eligible by way of scholarships, grants, and loans.

Athletic programs are available at MSU through the NCAA, allowing students to compete in intercollegiate sports. Athletic programs available include:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-A)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-A)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-A)

Students who would like to view more about MSU can check out their website at http://www.msstate.edu/.

Acceptance Rate

53.86

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

University of Cincinnati (UC) is one of the top 25 public research universities in the United States. Located in Ohio on what is considered one of the most beautiful college campuses in the world, the University of Cincinnati is ranked among the best national universities in 2010 by "US News and World Report" magazine.  The UC has also been named a "green university" by the Princeton Review.

Among its notable alumni are Joseph B. Strauss, who designed San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, and George Rieveschl, who invented Benadryl, the world's first antihistamine. Albert Sabin, another UC graduate, developed the first oral polio vaccine.

History

Founded in 1819 as the Cincinnati College and the Medical College of Ohio, which merged around 1870 to become the University of Cincinnati. The first "Cooperative Education" program was established at UC in 1906. In 1977, the University of Cincinnati joined the University System of Ohio.

Academics

The academic calendar of the University of Cincinnati currently follows the quarter system, but will be transitioning to the semester system in the fall of 2012. Students may contact their academic advisors for assistance and guidance for successful semester conversion of academic units.

UC has 308 programs of study, and offers 49 Associate's, 103 undergraduate, 152 graduate and four professional degrees.

Colleges and Schools

The University of Cincinnati's 14 colleges and schools are:

  • McMicken College of Arts and Sciences
  • College of Allied Health Sciences
  • College of Business
  • Clermont College
  • College-Conservatory of Music
  • College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning
  • College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services
  • College of Engineering and Applied Science
  • College of Law
  • College of Medicine
  • College of Nursing
  • James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy
  • Raymond Walters College
  • Graduate School

Student Life

Many choices for on-campus housing are offered at UC, including suite-style living, lifestyle floors (where you live with students from major, athletic team or honors program), and more.  There are also numerous dining venues on the UC campus, including a Starbucks café and vegetarian options.

The Student Life Offices on the UC campus offers many resources and choices of clubs, groups, organizations and leadership opportunities including the African American Cultural & Resource Center, Bearcat Bands, Early Learning Center, Women's Center, Greek Leaders Council, Student Government, and more.

Traditions

The University of Cincinnati has several traditions, including its bearcat mascot, Lucy.  The former bearcat mascot, Alice, was a fixture at UC's home athletics games for more than 12 years.  Since 1008, Lucy has attended many "Bearcat" sporting events.

Athletics

The Cincinnati "Bearcats" athletics teams compete in many intercollegiate sports and they have won many national championships.

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main, Cincinnati Uptown Campus, the University of Cincinnati has several satellite campuses in the Cincinnati area:

  • Cincinnati Uptown Campus: Uptown East Campus; Uptown West Campus
  • Clermont Campus
  • Medical Campus
  • Raymond Walters Campus
  • Reading Campus
  • Victory Parkway Campus

Community Life

The Campus Recreation Center (CRC) is located on UC's Uptown Campus and is open to students, employees and the community for recreation and fitness.  Many amenities are available, and events and activities at the CRC include guest lectures, parties, team-building events and sports tournaments. The Uptown East Campus offers recreation and exercise facilities at The Fitness Center.

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) offers excellent productions in drama, musical theatre and opera for students and community members.  The CCM's annual Mainstage Series is a big attraction for the local community.

Acceptance Rate

76.67

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

University of Iowa is a public university in Iowa City, considered to be one of the most dynamic colleges in the country, according to the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2011.  The university offers more than 100 areas of study at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The school also offers professional degrees. Its graduate programs in creative writing, audiology, nursing service administration, and speech-language pathology rank very high.

The University of Iowa, commonly known simply as "Iowa," has a well-respected faculty, and offers small class sizes, research opportunities for undergraduates and graduates, honors courses, special programs for transfer students, and discussion sessions to help first-year students.  Alumni include many notable figures, including inventors, distinguished researchers, doctors, CEOs, musicians, performers, athletes, politicians, and most notably, writers.  The Writer's Workshop of University of Iowa, founded in 1936, has produced 13 Pulitzer Prize winners since 1947.

History

The university was founded in 1847 as the State University of Iowa, a mere 59 days after Iowa became a state. Faculty did not offer instruction until 1855, and became the first public university to offer higher education equally to both men and women.  The first class of 124 students included 41 women.

Academics

The academic calendar for the University of Iowa includes four academic sessions during the school year: fall, winter, spring and summer.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Tippie College of Business
  • College of Dentistry
  • College of Education
  • College of Engineering
  • Graduate College
  • College of Law
  • Carver College of Medicine
  • College of Nursing
  • College of Pharmacy
  • College of Public Health
  • University College

Student Life

Students seeking involvement opportunities at University of Iowa have more than 450 student organizations to choose from.  There are also opportunities to attend a lecture by a visiting scholar, join a study group or a discussion group with an instructor.  There are many things to do on campus and also off-campus in Iowa City, including arts and entertainment, shopping, nightlife, sports and recreation.

There are 10 residence halls on campus, as well as university apartments for students with families.  Several of the fraternities and sororities near campus also offer housing.

Traditions

The University of Iowa school colors are black and gold.

Athletics

The "Hawkeye" athletics teams at the University of Iowa compete in more than 20 intercollegiate sports, with top teams in field hockey, wrestling and football.  The Dance Team and cheerleading are also very popular.

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The Iowa River flows through the University of Iowa's main campus in Iowa City, splitting it into west and east sides.  The university has one satellite campus in nearby Coralville, which is called Oakdale Campus.  Oakdale is home to many of the university's research facilities.

Community Life

The University of Iowa combines the benefits of a large, top-ranked school with the benefits of small-town life.  The "pedestrian mall" of the city offers many restaurants and bars, boutiques and shopping venues, museums and galleries, and there are plenty of recreational activities in the area.

Acceptance Rate

82.55

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

Oklahoma State University (OSU) is a public, land-grant university located in Stillwater, Oklahoma, that is committed to teaching, research and community outreach. OSU is one of the top universities in the nation, offering innovative study programs in a range of disciplines, top faculty, and a diverse student body.

OSU offers more than 350 academic degree programs at the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels. Professional degrees include the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. OSU also offers Specialist in Education degrees in certain fields.

The Mission

Proud of its land-grant heritage, Oklahoma State University advances knowledge, enriches lives, and stimulates economic development through instruction, research, outreach and creative activities.

Research is very active at OSU. Oklahoma State University students can benefit from the university's membership in the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) - a consortium of 96 colleges and universities located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The ORAU works with member institutions to assist students and faculty in gaining access to federal facilities nationwide for academic, research and partnership opportunities.

International studies and outreach are also thriving at OSU, which has a long tradition of excellent programs in international studies. Over the past 50 years, hundreds of OSU faculty members have participated in overseas projects through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

History

Founded in 1890 as Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, the first students enrolled for studies in 1891. Established shortly after the Land Run of 1889, the school opened with no buildings or books, and early classes were held in local churches.

In 1894, the first academic building was completed. This building, called "Old Central," is still located on campus OSU's main campus. In 1896, the first six students graduated.

In 1957, Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College was renamed Oklahoma State University. The school established technical branches in Oklahoma City and Okmulgee. Over the years, many of these technical branches merged with other colleges or schools to form the various colleges and campuses that are now part of OSU.

Academics

The academic calendar for Oklahoma State University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. OSU also offers shorter pre-sessions or inter-sessions before the beginning of each semester.

Colleges and Schools

Colleges at OSU:

  • Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
  • Arts and Sciences
  • Center for Health Sciences
  • Center for Veterinary Health Sciences
  • Education
  • Engineering, Architecture and Technology
  • Human Sciences
  • Spears School of Business
  • Graduate College

Student Life

There are many student organizations and clubs available for involvement at Oklahoma State University. Many student hobbies or interests are represented by already-established groups and range from political interests, to social, academic and recreational. However, students who are interested in forming a new student organization at OSU will find lots of guidance and support through the Office of Campus Life. Some of the resources available include graphic design services, advisor information, organizational leadership certificate, treasurer's module, customized workshops, and more.

The annual Camp Cowboy event offers incoming freshmen opportunities for making friendships and getting oriented to campus life before the start of their first academic year at OSU.

Fraternities and Sororities

OSU Greek Life is very active on campus, with many chapters of fraternities and sororities available. Community involvement through Greek Life is thriving and diverse, offering many opportunities for service and friendship.

Student services at OSU include:

  • Campus Safety
  • Counseling Services
  • Health Services
  • Student Affairs
  • Student Disability Services
  • Career Services
  • Student Government Association

Traditions

The official school colors for Oklahoma State University are orange, black and silver. The nickname for the men and women's athletic teams are the OSU "Cowboys" and "Cowgirls."

There are several traditional school songs associated with OSU, including:

The Waving Song

Oklahoma State! Oklahoma State!
We'll sing your praise tonight;
To let you know where e're we go,
For the Orange and Black we'll fight
We'll sing your worth o'er all the Earth
And shout: Ki Yi! Ki Ye!
In books of fame we'll write your name,
Oklahoma State!

"Ride 'Em Cowboys" Song

Ride, ride, ride, ride,
Ride'em Cowboys,
Right down the field!
Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight!
Fight'em Cowboys, and never yield.!
Ride, ride, ride, ride,
Ride on, Cowboys, to victory;
Cross (opponent)s goal;
Then we'll sing 'O-kla-homa State!'

Athletics

OSU is a member of the Big 12 Conference. The OSU "Cowboys" and "Cowgirls" athletic teams compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross County
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The Main Campus for Oklahoma State University is located in Stillwater, Oklahoma. This campus includes the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. There are four other campuses in the OSU System:

  • OSU-Oklahoma City
  • OSU Institute of Technology (formerly OSU-Okmulgee)
  • OSU-Tulsa
  • OSU Center for Health Sciences

Community Life

The Main Campus for OSU in Stillwater is in the north-central area of Oklahoma. Stillwater is roughly 60 miles from Tulsa and Oklahoma City.

Acceptance Rate

69.98

Student to Faculty Ratio

19:1

Ashland College is a nonprofit private institution located in Ashland, Ohio and provides a large number of degree programs for students. The school maintains a Brethren Church affiliation, which is evident in the role it plays in program curriculums and daily life at the school. Ashland College has an annual student enrollment of approximately six thousand. Areas of study offered at Ashland College include but are not limited to:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Education
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Psychology
  • Theology And Religious Vocations
To be considered for admissions, students may be required to fill out an application, write a personal statement, and submit high school records and test scores, which are then evaluated by admissions staff. A SAT or ACT exam is required prior to applying, with scores within the range of 1330 to 1630 on the SAT and between 20 to 25 for the ACT exam is typical among students accepted to Ashland College. This school has an acceptance rate of about 72% of which only 24% decided to enroll. More information from the admissions office can be found here. Tuition is approximately $31,000 for the year, though it may change based on any number of circumstances. Students may visit the school's net price calculator to find what your personalized cost of attendance would be. The price of on-campus housing is around $5,500 per year. Some students at Ashland University may be eligible for financial aid, which is generally offered as scholarships, grants, and loans. The Ashland University "Eagles" compete in a number of intercollegiate sports through participation in the NCAA. Sports available may include:
  • Baseball (NCAA Division II)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division II)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division II)
Students who wish to see more about Ashland College may take a look at their website at http://www.ashland.edu.

Acceptance Rate

71.17

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

Iowa State University (ISU) is a top ranking university in Ames, Iowa, which is considered one of the best places to live in America. The school's central campus is known for its beauty and historic landmarks, and is notable for its landscape architecture.

ISU offers degrees at the undergraduate and graduate levels in nearly 200 fields of study. At the undergraduate level, Iowa State University earns high marks for its academic programs in agriculture technology, sciences and arts. At the graduate level, ISU earns high marks for its programs in chemistry, statistics, physics, agricultural sciences, electrical engineering and economics.

The university also offers a variety of study abroad, service-learning, and work abroad programs. ISU attracts a diverse student population from all 50 states in the U.S. and more than 110 countries worldwide.

History

Iowa State University was one of the first land-grant universities established in the United States, after President Lincoln signed the law to establish colleges and universities throughout the country that would offer accessible higher education to all citizens, teach practical classes and share knowledge beyond the campus borders.

ISU was established in 1858 on a farm as "Iowa Agricultural College and Model Farm." The school's first campus building, "The Farm House," was completed in 1861. The first students enrolled in 1869, and graduated in 1872. Iowa Agricultural College was considered a leader in agriculture, engineering, and home economics, among other practical subjects.

An increasing focus on technology led to the development of the world's first electronic digital computer near the end of the 1930s. Due to expansion into more technological areas of study, the school changed its name to "Iowa State University of Science and Technology" in 1959. This name was later shortened to "Iowa State University." Over the years, Iowa State University further developed its offerings and continued to achieve academic excellence in its expanding and top-ranking programs in agriculture, technology, science and art.

Academics

The academic calendar of Iowa State University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
  • College of Business
  • College of Design
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Human Sciences
  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • College of Veterinary Medicine
  • Graduate College

Student Life

According to the Student Activities Center, there are hundreds of student clubs and organizations available for participation at ISU, and students will find them listed under categories such as Media Production, Music/Performing Arts, Multicultural, Honoraries, Fraternities, Sororities, and Special Interest, among others.  The Center offers information and resources to students who wish to start their own club or organization on campus.

There are also many groups, venues, facilities, workshops and events available for arts, entertainment and recreation.  ISU students can choose from live music performances, leadership activities or multi-media courses through The Union Workspace, such as pottery-making classes, photography workshops, and carpentry workshops. Other activities available include ballroom dance and rotating art exhibits.  There is a student group called "ISU After Dark" that plans late night events throughout the year.

Several different options for on-campus housing and on-campus dining are available.

Traditions

ISU school colors are cardinal (red) and gold, and its mascot is a cardinal (bird) named "Cy."

Iowa State University's teams were nicknamed the "Cyclones" by a news reporter who covered their football games in the 1890s. The school's athletic department eventually adopted the nickname as their official name for all of Iowa State's sports teams.

Athletics

The Iowa State "Cyclones" compete in 18 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Indoor Track and Field
  • Outdoor Track and Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Indoor Track and Field
  • Outdoor Track and Field
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Community Life

As a state, Iowa is known as an area of friendly people, small towns and close-knit communities. It is also known for good schools and nice cities, with plenty of opportunities for outdoor recreation in its many parks, as well as shopping and entertainment.

Ames, 30 minutes from Des Moines, is one of Iowa's nicest small towns. Due in part to the presence of Iowa State University, Ames draws top performers such as Dave Matthews, Kenny Chesney, international symphonies, Broadway musical tours, and more.

Acceptance Rate

92.05

Student to Faculty Ratio

19:1

The University of Colorado Denver (UCD or UC Denver) is a public research university with two campuses in Colorado - its Auraria Campus in Denver, and its Anschutz Medical Campus in nearby Aurora, Colorado. The UC Denver is one of the largest employers in Colorado, thanks in part to its University of Colorado Hospital and University Physicians, Inc.

The UC Denver offers more than 130 degree programs, including undergraduate degrees as well as graduate degrees at the master's and doctoral levels. It also awards professional degrees. The UCD has the only medical school in the state and the largest graduate business school. UCD has high research activity with its research programs primarily dedicated to medicine and health sciences.

History

UC Denver was founded in 1883 as the Department of Medicine and Surgery that was located at the Boulder Campus of the University of Colorado. In 1898, it opened its Department of Nursing. In 1892, the classes for these programs were moved to Denver, where more opportunities for practical learning experience existed. The movement of the medical departments from Boulder to Denver caused a series of political battles over where to locate these programs. By 1911, the School of Medicine had merged with the Denver Gross Medical College and developed a more comprehensive program in Denver. In 1925, the School of Medicine moved to a new campus location in Denver that later became the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. With the subsequent reshuffling of an army medical center, and renaming of the health and medical programs many years later, the UC Denver health sciences schools were relocated to the army base and became the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center at what is now known as the Anschutz Medical Campus.

Another branch of the University of Colorado Denver was established in 1912 as an Extension Center of the University of Colorado. This department of "correspondence and extension" grew over the years and moved locations several times, finally becoming the University of Colorado at Denver in 1974. In 2007, the university's name was refined to "University of Colorado Denver," comprised of its Downtown Campus and its Anschutz Medical Campus (University of Colorado Anshutz Medical Campus).

Academics

The academic calendar for the University of Colorado Denver follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Architecture and Planning
  • College of Arts & Media
  • Business School
  • School of Dental Medicine
  • School of Education and Human Development
  • College of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Graduate School
  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • School of Medicine
  • College of Nursing
  • School of Pharmacy
  • School of Public Affairs
  • Colorado School of Public Health

Student Life

More than 100 student clubs and organizations are available at the University of Colorado Denver, including professional groups, honor societies, and religious, political, social and service groups, among others. The student-run newspaper, the Advocate, is an opportunity for journalism students and others to get involved. Intramural sports include basketball, soccer, volleyball, tennis, and squash.

The UCD lecture series offers students the opportunity to hear from renowned guest speakers. Many other events and opportunities for recreation and entertainment are available.

Campus housing is available at the Campus Village on the Auraria Campus.

Traditions

The University of Colorado school colors are black and gold, and the school mascot is a buffalo named "Ralphie."

Athletics

The University of Colorado "Buffaloes" compete in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The University of Colorado Denver is comprised of two campuses - its downtown Denver Campus, which is officially named "Auraria Campus," and its Anschutz Medical Campus.

Community Life

Denver, Colorado offers visitors and students much to see and do. UC Denver's downtown campus (Auraria Campus) is near high-rise buildings of downtown Denver in the Theatre District. The Anschutz Medical Campus is in nearby Aurora, and offers easy access to the University of Colorado Hospital and The Children's Hospital.

There are many nice neighborhoods around both campuses, in nice tree lined metro areas. There is a good network of bicycle paths, as well as rail and bus systems. The area is renowned for its skiing, with plentiful snowfall in the ski areas.

Cultural events in the community include the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo, the sporting events of the Denver Broncos, and the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, to name a few.

Acceptance Rate

67.31

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Students at St. John's receive an education that includes both academic study and service to those less fortunate. The curriculum at St. John's includes centers of excellence that provide research opportunities in sustainable global development and social justice. Students can participate in volunteering, mentoring and "service learning" programs at all of St. John's campuses and beyond.

Among its more than 100,000 alumni are officials with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, leaders of well-known businesses and industries, and at least one successful producer in the entertainment industry.

History

The Vincentian Community founded St. John's University in 1870 as an educational institution committed to the values of St. Vincent de Paul. The St. John's approach to education places an emphasis on the teachings of St. Vincent, which focus on respect for the individual, human solidarity, service to the needy and making the world a better place.

Academics

The academic calendar for St. John's University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. Students have several ways to earn college credit during the summer through four summer sessions: Pre Session in May, Session I in May-July, Session II in July-August, and Post Session in August.

Colleges and Schools

The colleges and schools of St. John's University are:

  • St. John's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • The School of Education
  • The Peter J. Tobin College of Business
  • College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions
  • College of Professional Studies
  • St. John's Distance Learning
  • School of Law 

The centers and institutes at St. John's University include:

  • Center for Community Services
    • Center for Psychological Services
    • Reading and Writing Education Center
    • Speech and Hearing Center
  • Center for Global Development
  • Center for Professional Education
  • Center for Teaching and Learning
  • CLACS - Committee for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
  • Division of Academic Support Services
  • Division of Special and Opportunity Programs
  • Dr. Andrew J. Bartilucci Center
  • Emergency Medical Services Institute
  • English Language Institute: The Language Connection
  • Financial Services Institute
  • Grants and Sponsored Research
  • Health Education Resource Center (HERC)
  • Imagery Institute
  • Institute for Asian Studies
  • Institute for Biotechnology
  • Institute for Core Studies (ICS)
  • Institute for Writing Studies
  • Italian Cultural Center
  • Multicultural Advisory Committee
  • ROTC
  • Dr. M. T. Geoffrey Yeh Art Gallery
  • Vincentian Center for Church and Society
  • Women in Science Program

Student Life

Student life activities at St. John's University include campus ministry, multicultural affairs, intramural sports for men and women, campus fitness and recreation, and special campus activities like grocery bingo, where students can play bingo to win free groceries.

The student wellness program at St. John's, called "SWELLness," is committed to helping students maintain a holistic approach to their health in all areas, including physical, emotional, social, environmental, spiritual and intellectual. The SWELL calendar offers many health-related workshops and seminars through the year, including meditation courses.

St. John's three campuses in New York provide residential living. The Queens Campus provides six high-tech residence halls with wireless Internet access, study rooms, a computer center, lounges, dining hall and 24-hour security.

The Staten Island Campus offers modern, apartment-style living adjacent to campus, and the Manhattan Campus offers limited student housing in a 10-story high rise.

Traditions

The athletic program at St. John's University was founded in 1907 with its intercollegiate men's basketball program. In the beginning, this team was traditionally referred to as the "Wonder Five." The baseball team was established at St. John's at a later date, and made it to the College World Series several times between 1949 and 1968. Women's athletics were added in the 1970s. In the 1990s the St. John's athletic teams changed their nickname from the "Wonder Five" to the "Red Storm," a nickname that continues today.

The color of the athletic uniforms for St. John's has been red since the early days, and the traditional colors for the university are red and white.

Athletics

St. John's 17 "Red Storm" athletic teams compete in several intercollegiate sports including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Fencing
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its primary campus in Queens, New York, St. John's University has five satellite locations, including:

  • Staten Island, NY
  • Manhattan, NY
  • Oakdale, NY
  • Rome, Italy
  • Paris, France

Community Life

St. John's University has strong partnerships in the diverse communities of New York City. The Offices of Community Relations and Community Business Development at St. John's facilitate civic groups, social organizations, arts agencies, free concerts, special events, blood drives, food drives, community support for local businesses, and many charitable efforts.

Acceptance Rate

72.34

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

University of Nebraska - Lincoln (UNL), is a top public research university that has pioneered many "firsts." It was one of the first institutions of higher learning west of the Mississippi River to grant doctoral degrees (the first it awarded was in 1896). UNL was also the first university to establish ecology as an academic discipline, and its campus is a perfect representation of nature, with beautiful arboreta and gardens. One of the earliest universities to celebrate the arts and literature, UNL gave birth to the literary magazine "Prairie Schooner." It also created foundations for the University of Nebraska Press and the Sheldon Museum of Art.

UNL has many well-funded research projects, led by faculty who are recognized scientists and scholars. In addition to its research and graduate programs, UNL is known for its excellent undergraduate programs. Some of these programs include the Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experience Program (UCARE), which connects research faculty to students for collaboration on independent study projects. Outstanding students who wish to develop leadership skills can enroll leadership programs in the Jeffrey S. Raikes School of Computer Science and Management.

The entire undergraduate student body can participate in the Nebraska Colloquium, which involves the UNL academic community in an annual intellectual discourse on a topic of importance. This program provides a mechanism for activities and events in different academic units that contribute to the theme. Additionally, the University Honors Program hosts Honors Forum talks on world issues.

History

The University of Nebraska - Lincoln was established in 1869, and covered four city blocks. University Hall was the first campus building, which began to crumble by the time a second building was constructed in 1886. The conditions of the prairie were quite harsh, killing many of the trees and flowers that were planted on campus. In the 1890s, the university constructed its library from stronger materials that would withstand the elements of the prairie.

In 1873, the university established a nearby farm campus, and later an experimental research station in North Platte.  In 1902, the Medical College of Omaha merged with the University of Nebraska - Lincoln. In 1909, UNL was admitted to the Association of American Universities.  In 1906, John D. Rockefeller contributed funds for the construction of a student activity center, known as the Temple Building, among others.

Academics

The academic calendar for the UNL follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

The colleges of the University of Nebraska - Lincoln include:

  • College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
  • College of Architecture
  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • College of Business Administration
  • College of Education and Human Sciences
  • College of Engineering
  • The Hixson-Lied College of Fine and Performing Arts
  • College of Graduate Studies
  • College of Journalism and Mass Communications
  • College of Law 

UNL also offers programs through the UNO College of Public Affairs and Community Service, and the UNMC colleges of Nursing and Dentistry.

Student Life

More than 400 student clubs and organizations are offered at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln. These organizations cover student interests ranging from academic or professional to social, cultural, religious or athletic. There is a campus-based office of Greek Affairs, and there are numerous local chapters of fraternities and sororities available for participation. Student government offers many opportunities for leadership, and many other student activities and events foster the learning of new skills and forging of new friendships. There is an RSO Fair offered every semester to help students choose the club or organization that is right for them.

The office of Student Involvement offers these additional resources for students who wish to form their own student organization:

  • Learn how to plan a budget, receive an excused absence from a class and more
  • Free Pepsi for your organization
  • Meet other students and learn about organizations at the RSO Fair
  • Create a website or email address for your organization
  • Search for a Recognized Student Organization
  • Start your own Recognized Student Organization
  • Get help with event planning
  • Get your organization its own office space
  • Promote your event with the help of the Creation Station
  • Request funds for your organization
  • Find out how to properly use UNL logos
  • Read the RSO Newsletter
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On campus housing is available, as well as a variety of dining services. In addition, there is now a campus-based "Campus NightLife" that provides safe, free activities for students wishing to enjoy a nightlife within their campus community. Some of the sponsored events and entertainments include the outdoor music concert called "Midwest Acoustic Fest," the "Husker Watch Party," that allows students to view Huskers athletics games on the Jumbo Screen at Memorial Stadium, and many other themed and seasonal events.

Traditions

The UNL school colors are red and white, and the school mascot is the huskers.

Athletics

The UNL "Huskers" athletic teams compete in numerous intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Bowling
  • Cross Country
  • Gymnastics
  • Rifle
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball 

Satellite Campuses

UNL has two primary campuses in Lincoln, Nebraska - its City Campus and East Campus.

Community Life

UNL is located in Lincoln, Nebraska, a large, friendly midwestern city with vibrant culture and entertainment. Known for its abundant parks and extensive bike trails, the Lincoln offers many outdoor activities. It is also known for its safety, low cost of living, and increasing business development, making it a highly desired place to live.

The university is contributing to the local community through its Global Water for Food Institute, a program that helps meet a critical need for using water resources efficiently for agriculture.

Acceptance Rate

78.23

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

Top Toxicology Degrees

A degree program in toxicology will focus on the metabolic biology, genetics, and physiological of toxicants as related to human health and diseases.  The depth and breadth of this field of study can make for an exciting career path.

Students and professionals in this field of study work hard to understand an individual’s metabolism.  In addition, work is done to understand how a person’s metabolism is regulated and the interplay between disease, metabolism, and diet.

To help you determine which degree program is best for you, we have created summaries of each pathway along with means to connect with accredited colleges and universities below.

Toxicology Bachelor Degrees

A bachelor degree for toxicology students will be conferred as a Bachelor of Science (BS).  Bachelor degree programs will typically take upwards of four-years of full time study to complete.  Students take a combination of science-rich classes with general education classes to obtain a well-rounded education and develop a set of integrative thinking skills.

General education classes will typically include history, English composition, economics, statistics, psychology, and philosophy.  Core classes in toxicology will often include the following science-rich classes:

  • Nutrient Function and Metabolism
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Molecular Toxicogenomic
  • Pharmacology and Toxicology
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology
  • Chemistry
  • Biopharmaceutical Chemistry
  • Medical Ethics
  • Pharmacologic Toxicology
  • Analytic and Qualitative Tox
  • Risk Analysis
  • Human Diet
  • Medical Nutrition Therapy
  • Biology
  • Nutrition in the Community
  • Physics
  • Biology, Statistics, Chemistry

Toxicology Master Degrees

Master degrees in toxicology can be earned as a Master of Science (MS) from top colleges around the country.  Many MS degree programs are customized by students by selecting an array of electives versus a rigid group of predetermined courses.

Students will have access to cutting edge technology and learn via a series of labs, lectures, seminars, case studies, and research.  Graduate students can expect a master’s degree program to take around two-years to complete at most colleges and universities.

A large portion of master’s degree includes research, writing, and presenting a thesis project.  Thesis projects are intended to add substantive value to the existing body of knowledge in the field of study.

Toxicology Doctorate Degrees

Doctorate degrees in toxicology are conferred as a PhD.  With a heavy emphasis on research, students can expect to spend a substantial amount of time in a lab blending book knowledge with hands-on learning.

Many complex diseases cannot be attributed solely to genetics thus leaving scientists to find the root cause of environmental factors.  In fact, chemicals have been shown to cause a number of diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and atherosclerosis.  As such, scientists work to understand how environmental factors combine to affect individuals and groups of people to help mitigate their overall effects.

PhD students will take a number of rigorous classes while preparing their dissertation project.  Dissertations are multi-year projects that end with a presentation to a panel of experts in the field.

Toxicology Requirements

In terms of educational requirements, toxicology majors will have taken specific courses in this learning domain. Apart from the general education requirements, students will take a clustering of science classes such as the following:

Employment in Toxicology

Toxicology majors will have garnered key medical knowledge and skills during college. The specialized knowledge can be used to step into a career in toxicology or adjacent medical fields. Direct-hire arrangements allow students to prepare for a career with a specific employer after graduation.

Majors that work in the medical community may spent substantive time performing research. Laboratory research can be independently performed or as part of a clinical trial. A clinical trial will include a team of medical professionals to create a viable trail and willing patients to be part of the test. By comparing two or more groups of patients in a trail, toxicologists can help decipher the efficacy of a drug after analyzing key attributes of each individual.

Meanwhile. students may be interested in similar employment opportunities that utilize this knowledge. Examples of such careers include teaching, research, genome specializations, immunology, virology, biomedical engineering, microbiology, and epidemiology.

Top Careers in Toxicology

Finding a job after graduation will typically be in a handful of industries in a wide array of positions. The industries that are most likely to employ a trained toxicologist include:

  1. Industry: Companies known for developing an array of products & performing research for food, biotechnical, chemical, and pharmaceutical companies.
  2. Healthcare: This filed includes hospitals, clinics, research firms, dentists, optometry, biotechnology, dietician, pharmacy and a wide variety of other healthcare-related positions. Many students leverage a degree in toxicology to launch an academic career as a pre-med student on a path to become a doctor.
  3. Education: Graduates often find themselves teaching chemical, biological, nutritional and food sciences. In addition to teaching and writing papers, graduates may perform deep research to advance the field of study in meaningful ways.
  4. Governmental: Working for a variety of state and federal government agencies in a research or policy capacity may be of interest to students. From working for the FDA to the EPA, jobs are in demand for passionate and well-trained graduates.

Toxicology Salary & Job Growth

Mean annual income for toxicologists is $96,070 or $46.19 an hour.  The top ten percent average over $160,000 a year with the bottom twenty-five percent at approximately fifty-eight thousand dollars a year.  Top paying states in toxicology include New Jersey and New Hampshire, followed by Connecticut and Maryland.  The largest employers of toxicology majors are R&D firms, colleges, hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, and physicians.

Toxicologist jobs are forecast to be plentiful in the coming decade.  In fact, the BLS estimates an employment spike of 13% in near term.  Job growth of this pace will create approximately 17,000 new jobs in this occupation.

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